Tag Archives: Rock Terrace

1929 : Rock Terrace Character Dead

All Rock Terrace attended the funeral at Mitcham Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon of Mr Matthew Marney, aged sixty-three, a well-known Rock Terrace character.

There was a wonderful tribute of flowers. Mr Marney, like many of his relatives and friends at Mitcham and Tooting, was a flower hawker at one time.

There was a long procession of mourners who followed the remains from Queen’s Road and filled Parish Church. The Vicar of Mitcham conducted the service. The hearse was covered with wreaths and a coach carried the remainder.

Mitcham Advertiser, 4th April, 1929, page 1.

Rock Terrace Recreation Ground

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District council
Volume VIII 1922 to 1923
Finance and General Purposes
Page 92

16. Rock Terrace.
Read letter from the Mitcham Municipal League asking the Council to consider the advisability of securing vacant land in the neighbourhood of Rock Terrace for a recreation ground.

Resolved, That the Chairman of the Committee be authorised to approach Mr. Hatfeild thereon.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

1876 A Drunken Woman

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 06 May 1876 from the British Newspaper Archives (subscription required)

A Drunken Woman.

At the Croydon Police Court, on Tuesday, Sophia Coffins, described a married woman, living Rock terrace, Queen’s-road, Mitcham, was charged with being drunk on the 29th of April.

P.-c. 140 W stated that at five minutes past 11 o’clock Saturday night he found the prisoner drunk in the street and shouting. She created great disturbance, and caused crowd of persons to assemble round her. He requested her to go away, but as she would not he took her into custody. On the Saturday previous witness had occasion to speak to her, and she then said that her husband was dying.

The Bench convicted the prisoner, and ordered her to pay a fine of 2s. 6d. and costs, 2s. 6d.

Volunteer Fire Brigade

Mitcham’s fire brigade was a volunteer service until 1920, when Albert Wells was appointed Chief Officer. He introduced retaining fees for the chief and sub officers at each station, and remunerations for drills and call-outs for the firemen.

Stories from the British Newspaper Archive

(subscription required)

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 07 September 1889

The Volunteer Fire Brigade.

—The annual test drill of the brigade took place on Wednesday evening, when the men mustered in full force and arrived at the tanyard, Beddington Corner, with their engine punctually at six p.m., and in about three minutes got to work with one jet. To this was shortly added another, junction being made in the hose about ten yards from the engine ; another connection was rapidly made from the engine with additional hose, and three powerful jets of water were concentrated on point where an imaginary fire was raging. A correspondent who witnessed the drill is of opinion that from observations made and the excellent espirit de corps shown the men, that this, as an entirely volunteer brigade, in a position to cope with any emergency which may arise in the vicinity. An essential point with men who give their time and labour gratis is having confidence in their leader, and this the Mitcham men certainly have in Superintendent A. R. Harwood. The following members of the committee were present to witness the proceedings, viz., Mr. S. Wells (chairman), Mr. Harwood, sen., Dr. Love, Mr. Sampson, and Mr. S. Love.


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 23 February 1889

MITCHAM.
The Mitcham Volunteer Fire Brigade.

— The committee of this brigade entertained the members to dinner on Wednesday evening, at the Old Nag’s Head, Upper Mitcham. Mr. Wells, the chairman committee, occupied the chair, and Mr. A. R. Harwood, the superintendent of the brigade, the vice-chair. There were present Messrs. W. R. Harwood, Dr. Love, F. G. Sampson, R. M Chart. S. Love, and W. Jenner, members of the committee, and the brigade with the turncock and call-boys. An excellent repast was put upon the table by Mr Tomlin, and served in his best style, to which ample justice was done. The usual loyal toasts were also given, with that of the brigade, committee, &c. and a most enjoyable evening was spent. During the evening some capital songs were rendered by Messrs Shepherd, Brown, Dill, Turner, and others.


Agricultural Express – Saturday 25 February 1893

MITCHAM.

FIRE.

—On Thursday morning a fire, which originated in a store used for frying fish, broke out at 2, Rock-terrace. The rafters in the chimney had caught alight, but the volunteer fire brigade were able to extinguish the flames with a few buckets of water. The house was occupied by woman named Patience Stone.


1879 Rock Terrace Coffee and Club Room

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 12 April 1879

Rock-Terrace Coffee and Club Room.

— A successful entertainment was given in the Mission Room connected with the above on Friday evening, April 4th, by the Band of Hope branch of the Church of England Temperance Society. A. Maclaclan, Esq., took the chair. The choir sang several pieces during the evening.

The recitations were excellent, and the following are deserving of special notice :

“They didn’t think;” by Alfred Bale;
“A dinner and a kiss,” Alice Boxall;
“The blind men and the elephant,” William Goodge;
“The twins’ mishaps,” George Bale;
“Christmas in the bush,” Louisa Singleton;
“Cruel play,” Alfred Gardiner;
“Billy’s rose” (from the Dagonet ballads), Ruth Smith;
“The little boy’s speech,” Frank Boxall;
“My first doll,” Rose Greenaway;
“Paddy and the jug,” Emily Boxall;
“The newsboy’s debt,” Lillian Service.

A hearty vote of thanks was given at the close to Mr. W. Service and Mr. J. R. Chart, the secretaries, also to Miss Glanister, who presided at the harmonium, and all who had taken part.

Rock Terrace

A terrace of houses built near the crossroads of two field paths. One path went from the parish church, north-westerly across the fields; the other ran east to west along Fox’s Path.

This OS map of 1866 shows where these two paths met, and, while Rock Terrace is not actually named, the buildings outlined in red may well be it.

Later, the terrace was extended and the road was named Belgrave Road, with the path leading to the church being called Belgrave Walk.

Earliest reference found so far in the newspaper archives is for an auction of 9 houses in Rock Terrace.

Freehold ground-rent of £21 per annum, arising from nine houses in Rock-terrace, Mitcham — £115.

Source: Morning Advertiser – Wednesday 29 August 1866 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

This 1910 map shows the outline of houses in Belgrave Road. Given that Batsworth Road was laid on the original path from Fox’s Path, then the 9 houses referred to in the auction may well have been the whole terrace.

News Stories

1922 Rock Terrace Recreation Ground

A major event was the Explosion of 1933.

King George V Silver Jubilee Celebrations in 1935

Note that Lady Worsfold, residing at Hall Place when this photo was taken, moved to the White House at the cricket green the following year when her husband, T. Cato worsfold, died.

Rock Terrace and Queen Street (sic), Mitcham, Jubilee Tea. From Mitcham News & Mercury, 31st May, 1935.

Rock Terrace and Queen Street (sic), Mitcham, Jubilee Tea. From Mitcham News & Mercury, 31st May, 1935.


Merton Memories Photos

Church Class

Off to the Races – this photo was reproduced in Eric Montague’s Mitcham Histories: 8 Phipps bridge, on page 113 with the caption that it was around 1910.

1873 Rock Terrace labourer cautioned

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 08 November 1873

Guy Fawkes Orgies.

— On Thursday morning, William Wallace, labourer, of 12, Rock-terrace, Mitcham, whose face was blackened apparently through a liberal application of burnt cork, was charged before the Croydon magistrates with wilfully breaking a square of glass, value 1s., the property of Mr. Barnard Cox, of 6, Dixon’s-cottages, Figg’s-marsh, Mitcham. The prosecutor stated that Wednesday evening, six or seven persons, among whom was the prisoner, came rushing into his shop, and made a disturbance. He asked them to leave quietly, but they only made more noise. At last they went outside, and the defendant, flourishing a stick which he carried, broke a square glass.

— The Bench appeared to think that the damage was done more accident than design, and after asking the defendant the meaning his blackened face, he was ordered to pay a shilling for the damage, and was discharged with a caution not to get into such a scrape again.