Tag Archives: Rock Terrace

1879 : A Question of Sobriety

From the Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 03 May 1879 via the British Newspaper Archive

A QUESTION OF SOBRIETY.—PUBLICAN’S AMENITIES.

— At the Croydon Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Parkes Hope, landlord of the Bath Tavern Mitcham, was summoned for serving intoxicated persons with liquor on his premises on the 16th April; and Alfred Stevens, James Stevens, and Joseph Munt were summoned for being found drunk on the premises. Mr. Dennis appeared for the defendants.

— P.-c. 382 W stated that on the 14th April he was on duty in Church-road, Mitcham, when he saw James Stevens drunk and incapable. He also saw Alfred Stevens and Joseph Munt, who were drunk, but not incapable. The two latter were supporting James Stevens between them. Witness saw them enter the Star beerhouse, Church-road, and heard them call for beer. Mr. Chapman, the landlord, however, refused to serve them. They then proceeded to Rock-terrace, and he saw them enter the Bath Tavern. Alfred Stevens called for a pot of beer, and was served by the landlord. Witness saw Alfred Stevens and Munt drink from the pot. A disturbance arose between them, and Alfred Stevens and Munt dragged James Stevens from the bar, and after great difficulty succeeded in getting him home. Witness told the landlord that he should have to report the case, when Mr. Hope replied that he had drawn the beer himself, but did not know that the parties were drunk when they came in.

— William Chapman, landlord of the Star beerhouse, gave evidence as to the elder defendant, James Stevens, coming into his house alone on the evening in question. He was very drunk, and witness refused to serve him, and tried to get him out of the house. While he was doing Alfred Stevens and Munt came into the house, and assisted him in getting the old man out of the house. —Neither Alfred Stevens nor Munt were intoxicated.

— Mr. Dennis said his answer to the case was that on the day in question the younger Stevens drove his master to Thames Ditton, and on his return to Mitcham learnt that his father, who was upwards of 70 years of age, was in the Star beerhouse, drunk. He went there and got his father out, and was assisted by Munt in getting him home. On their way, having to pass the Bath Tavern, they went in, and having placed the old man on a seat, they called for a pot of beer, which the two drank between them, but the old man did not have a drop.

— Mr. Hope, landlord of the Bath Tavern, Alfred Stevens, and several others were called as witnesses, and their evidence confirming the above statement, James Stevens was fined 10s. and 7s. costs. The other summonses were dismissed.

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1879 : 14 days in jail for stealing a hayfork

MITCHAM.

James Nutlay, labourer, of the Causeway, Mitcham, was charged at the Croydon Police-court on Monday with stealing a hayfork, the property of Mr. Woodman, of Mitcham.

— Wm. Burrell, a labourer of Rock Terrace, Mitcham, deposed that on going to work on Saturday morning about 6.30, he missed the hayfork, and being unable to find it, he was about to go to Mr. Woodman to get another, when he saw the prisoner, with whom he had worked a short time ago. Witness went to him and accused him of taking the fork. Prisoner said had taken it to get some food and drink.

The prisoner was ordered to be sent gaol for 14 days.

Source: Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette – Saturday 04 October 1879 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1929 : Rock Terrace Character Dead

All Rock Terrace attended the funeral at Mitcham Cemetery on Tuesday afternoon of Mr Matthew Marney, aged sixty-three, a well-known Rock Terrace character.

There was a wonderful tribute of flowers. Mr Marney, like many of his relatives and friends at Mitcham and Tooting, was a flower hawker at one time.

There was a long procession of mourners who followed the remains from Queen’s Road and filled Parish Church. The Vicar of Mitcham conducted the service. The hearse was covered with wreaths and a coach carried the remainder.

Mitcham Advertiser, 4th April, 1929, page 1.

Rock Terrace Recreation Ground

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District council
Volume VIII 1922 to 1923
Finance and General Purposes
Page 92

16. Rock Terrace.
Read letter from the Mitcham Municipal League asking the Council to consider the advisability of securing vacant land in the neighbourhood of Rock Terrace for a recreation ground.

Resolved, That the Chairman of the Committee be authorised to approach Mr. Hatfeild thereon.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

1876 A Drunken Woman

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 06 May 1876 from the British Newspaper Archives (subscription required)

A Drunken Woman.

At the Croydon Police Court, on Tuesday, Sophia Coffins, described a married woman, living Rock terrace, Queen’s-road, Mitcham, was charged with being drunk on the 29th of April.

P.-c. 140 W stated that at five minutes past 11 o’clock Saturday night he found the prisoner drunk in the street and shouting. She created great disturbance, and caused crowd of persons to assemble round her. He requested her to go away, but as she would not he took her into custody. On the Saturday previous witness had occasion to speak to her, and she then said that her husband was dying.

The Bench convicted the prisoner, and ordered her to pay a fine of 2s. 6d. and costs, 2s. 6d.

Volunteer Fire Brigade

Mitcham’s fire brigade was a volunteer service until 1920, when Albert Wells was appointed Chief Officer. He introduced retaining fees for the chief and sub officers at each station, and remunerations for drills and call-outs for the firemen.

Stories from the British Newspaper Archive

(subscription required)

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 07 September 1889

The Volunteer Fire Brigade.

—The annual test drill of the brigade took place on Wednesday evening, when the men mustered in full force and arrived at the tanyard, Beddington Corner, with their engine punctually at six p.m., and in about three minutes got to work with one jet. To this was shortly added another, junction being made in the hose about ten yards from the engine ; another connection was rapidly made from the engine with additional hose, and three powerful jets of water were concentrated on point where an imaginary fire was raging. A correspondent who witnessed the drill is of opinion that from observations made and the excellent espirit de corps shown the men, that this, as an entirely volunteer brigade, in a position to cope with any emergency which may arise in the vicinity. An essential point with men who give their time and labour gratis is having confidence in their leader, and this the Mitcham men certainly have in Superintendent A. R. Harwood. The following members of the committee were present to witness the proceedings, viz., Mr. S. Wells (chairman), Mr. Harwood, sen., Dr. Love, Mr. Sampson, and Mr. S. Love.


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 23 February 1889

MITCHAM.
The Mitcham Volunteer Fire Brigade.

— The committee of this brigade entertained the members to dinner on Wednesday evening, at the Old Nag’s Head, Upper Mitcham. Mr. Wells, the chairman committee, occupied the chair, and Mr. A. R. Harwood, the superintendent of the brigade, the vice-chair. There were present Messrs. W. R. Harwood, Dr. Love, F. G. Sampson, R. M Chart. S. Love, and W. Jenner, members of the committee, and the brigade with the turncock and call-boys. An excellent repast was put upon the table by Mr Tomlin, and served in his best style, to which ample justice was done. The usual loyal toasts were also given, with that of the brigade, committee, &c. and a most enjoyable evening was spent. During the evening some capital songs were rendered by Messrs Shepherd, Brown, Dill, Turner, and others.


Agricultural Express – Saturday 25 February 1893

MITCHAM.

FIRE.

—On Thursday morning a fire, which originated in a store used for frying fish, broke out at 2, Rock-terrace. The rafters in the chimney had caught alight, but the volunteer fire brigade were able to extinguish the flames with a few buckets of water. The house was occupied by woman named Patience Stone.


1879 Rock Terrace Coffee and Club Room

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 12 April 1879

Rock-Terrace Coffee and Club Room.

— A successful entertainment was given in the Mission Room connected with the above on Friday evening, April 4th, by the Band of Hope branch of the Church of England Temperance Society. A. Maclaclan, Esq., took the chair. The choir sang several pieces during the evening.

The recitations were excellent, and the following are deserving of special notice :

“They didn’t think;” by Alfred Bale;
“A dinner and a kiss,” Alice Boxall;
“The blind men and the elephant,” William Goodge;
“The twins’ mishaps,” George Bale;
“Christmas in the bush,” Louisa Singleton;
“Cruel play,” Alfred Gardiner;
“Billy’s rose” (from the Dagonet ballads), Ruth Smith;
“The little boy’s speech,” Frank Boxall;
“My first doll,” Rose Greenaway;
“Paddy and the jug,” Emily Boxall;
“The newsboy’s debt,” Lillian Service.

A hearty vote of thanks was given at the close to Mr. W. Service and Mr. J. R. Chart, the secretaries, also to Miss Glanister, who presided at the harmonium, and all who had taken part.