Tag Archives: Lower Green West

Glebe Square

Social housing built by Mitcham Borough Council, in 1955, on the site of the Glebe Villas. The council’s 2,500th post-war dwelling was completed there.

The blocks of flats are arranged as a square, with the western side on the east side of Glebe Path. The two southern blocks face Lower Green West, but are separated from it by fencing. There are two other blocks, one on the eastern and the other on the northern side.

There are 36 properties in total, numbered anti-clockwise sequentially from 1. In 1960 an attempt was made to change the numbers of the western block that had doors facing onto Glebe Path. Protests from homeowners in that road prevented this. See Glebe Path renumbering.

Layout of Glebe Square. Lower Green West is at the bottom of this diagram.

Layout of Glebe Square. Lower Green West is at the bottom of this diagram.

Aerial view of Glebe Square. The road on the left of the square is Glebe Path.

Aerial view of Glebe Square, looking northwards. The road on the left of the square is Glebe Path.

Queen Anne’s Bounty

To help with the income of poor clergy, the Queen Anne’s Bounty was a sum of money used to buy land. This land was then rented out and this rental income was used to support the clergy.

In 1734, £200 of this Royal Bounty was used to buy an area of land from Charles Dubois in Mitcham, to support the vicar at the parish church.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Eric Montague, in his Mitcham Histories : 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, page 107, said that more land was bought in 1762 from Mary Gellibrand.

This OS map of 1867 shows areas marked as ‘Glebe’. Note that the London Road was, as shown on this map, known as Whitford Lane.

1867 OS map

1867 OS map

Later, parts of this land was sold off to developers to build houses. Montague, page 108, ibid., said that in 1790 a substantial plot was sold to build a house cwhich became Glebelands.

In the Land Registry title for a house in Preshaw Crescent for example, a conveyance was made in 1897:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father in God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

See also Queen Anne’s Bounty on wikipedia.

Preshaw Crescent

Photo taken 2nd January, 2017

Photo taken 2nd January, 2017

Photo possibly taken after the houses were built.

Photo possibly taken after the houses were built.

A row of four pairs of houses from the corner with Glebe Path running west, in parallel with, but set back from, Lower Green West. Built after 1897 on the site of a pond, which is shown in this 1866 map:

1866 OS map

1866 OS map

According to Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories: 5 Lower Green West, page 11, the pond measured 200 feet by 50 feet and had been called King’s Pond. The sub-soil here is sand and gravel and Montague suggested that this was originally a pit dug for the gravel, which would be used in building. With the water table high the pit would have filled in with water forming the pond.


The year of 1897 comes from the Land Registry title for number 6, which was auctioned in early 2016:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father In God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

The restrictive covenant contained in the conveyance of 2nd September 1897 stated that …

the purchaser would within 12 months of the date of abstracting presents erect not less than 4 detached houses or two pairs of semi detached houses on the premises.

That no buildings other than dwelling houses with their offices should be erected on the premises the prime cost of which for work and materials should not be less than £400 or in case of pairs of semi-detached dwellinghouses should not be less prime cost than £650 per pair.


This 1910 OS map shows the four pairs of houses:

1910 OS Map

1910 OS Map

Occupants

From the 1915 street directory:

Lower green west, from London Road
NORTH SIDE

… here is Glebe Path
PRESHAW CRESCENT:
1, Charles STUART
3, George Henry NELSON
4, Robert CHART
5, Arthur LANGRISH
7, Charles Clarke APLIN
8, John David CLARKE

From the 1925 street directory:

Lower green west, from London Road to Church Road
WEST SIDE

PRESHAW CRESCENT:
1, Charles STUART
2, Miss Bessie May MARTIN
3, George NELSON
4, John William ALLEN
5, Arthur LANGRISH
6, Charles R SINCLAIR
7, Mrs HOLLIS
8, Herbert E HART
9, George W.T. ORMOND

Note that number 9 is possibly the White Cottage.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Unveiling of the Mitcham War Memorial

12th November 1919

published in the Mitcham and Tooting Mercury on 12th November 1920

From the Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, 26th November, 1920

UNVEILING OF MITCHAM’S WAR MEMORIAL.

The war shrine, situated on the Lower Green, Mitcham, was unveiled last Sunday by Major-General Sir H. E. Watts, K.C.B., C.M.G. (formerly commanding the 7th Division and 19th Corps, B.E.F.). The weather, although very cold, was fine, and about 5,000 people were present at the unveiling.

Alderman R. M. Chart (Chairman of the War Memorial Committee) said that this shrine was to commemorate the self-sacrifice of those who made the supreme sacrifice, and show our undying sorrow felt by those who have lost dear ones in the late war. Two years ago the war terminated, and in February, 1919, a committee was formed for the purpose of raising funds for the war shrine. There was some difficulty as to the most prominent place for the shrine, and on Peace Day, when the temporary memorial was put behind the Vestry Hall, it was proposed that that should be the site for the permanent one. It is also proposed now that a fencing should be placed round the shrine, but with facilities for the public to place flowers on it, which he (Mr. R. M. Chart) was sure they would do from time to time. He also said that every effort had been made to obtain the names of men who had been killed in action or died of wounds, and, at present, there were 557 names inscribed on the shrine, and since then more had come to hand, and would be inscribed in due course. The speaker then said it was his duty and pleasure to introduce Major-General Sir H. E. Watts, K.C.B., C.M.G., who had well served his country in the late war. He was commanding in the first and third Battle of Ypres.

Major-General Sir H. E. Watts, K.C.B., C.M.G., said, after what Mr. Chart had said, there was not much more to say, but there was one incident that he would like to remind them of, and that was the late Earl Kitchener’s appeal of “Your King and Country need you,” at the beginning of the war, in which all men flocked to enlist. “Why !” because they knew that they were going to fight for freedom and endure the hardships of war, which was a fine example of self-sacrifice and unselfishness. All honour was due to them who came forward at the country’s call. The men, women and children were also a great help, for, while we soldiers were fighting, those at home endured many hardships, but without murmuring. He then unveiled the memorial, and the “Last Post” was played by buglers of the East Surrey Regiment.

The hymn, “Nearer my God to Thee,” was sung, and then the invocation and prayers were said by Rev. C. A. Finch, the Vicar of Mitcham, after which Rev. J. F. Cowley, the the Zion Congregational Church, said a few words.

Rev. J. F. Cowley said that, in doing honour to those who laid down their lives for us, there should be no mistake, for if they had not done so, no English home would be intact and safe to-day, but the unspeakable happenings in Belgium would have happened in England, and, perhaps, have been even worse, because it was against England that the Germans were so bitter and revengeful. He said we should thank God and our fallen heroes for such a merciful deliverance, and also think God for such sons, fathers, brothers and sweethearts who so cheerfully laid down their lives to save us from shame and dishonour. They must not forget to honour and thank the mothers who gave the best, they had got; and in the future, when one was in despair, they should just go to the shrine and remember what, Englishmen could and did do for their country, because they thought that, if it was worth living for, it was worth dying for. Those present then proceeded to place their floral tributes on the shrine, during which Mr. Rudyard Kipling’s “Recessional” was sung.

The Jubilee Lodge, R.A.O.B., sent a wreath in memory of fallen “Buffs.” Other lodges also sent wreaths.

The special constables were present under the command of Inspectors Webb and Freeman. Colonel Bidder, D.S.O., was present, and a detachment of ex-Service men lined up round the inside of the ropes. The music for the hymns was played by the Mitcham and Wimbledon Military Band, conducted by Mr. H. Salter.

1962 Cleaning of the Mitcham War Memorial

The Mitcham War Memorial on Lower Green West was cleaned in 1962.

The contract for the cleaning was awarded to Neonore Stone Cleaning Co. Two extra inscription panels were added during this work.

On the fifth plinth step:

AND
TO THE MEMORY
OF THE MEN, WOMEN
AND CHILDREN OF MITCHAM
WHO LOST THEIR LIVES
IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR
1939 – 1945

and between the fourth and fifth plinth steps

AND THOSE KILLED
IN OTHER CONFLICTS

From the Mitcham News & Mercury

10th August 1962 : Face-lift for war memorial

MITCHAM’S 40-year-old First World War Memorial is to have a face lift.

In their 1962 estimates Mitcham Council have put aside ” a certain amount of money ” for the restoration of the memorial, which has been affected by the weather.

According to the borough engineers’ department the face-lift is expected to take place some time during October.

Since the memorial was built in the early 1920’s many of the names and inscriptions have faded—some have been worn completely away—and now the local council feel it is time for a restoration.

A spokesman for the borough engineers’ department said this week: ” The memorial is quite weather-beaten and we are planning to re-cut the names and inscriptions.”

17th August 1962 : Weather erases names

MITCHAM COUNCIL have had quite a job deciphering the names on the First World War Memorial at Lower Green West, near the fire station.

During the 40 years the memorial has been standing it has taken quite a beating from the weather so that now most names can hardly be read. A spokesman for the borough engineer’s department said that it was the initials causing the most bother. Same of them had worn off completely. A list of the names has been taken off the memorial which will be cleaned and smoothed so that the names can be recut. The council hope to have the work completed before Armistice Day on November 11.

10th October 1962 : £118 bill for memorial work

The restoration of the war memorial, Lower Green, Mitcham, is to cost Mitcham Council £118 plus 1s. 2d. for the re-cutting of each letter.

It has also been decided by the council to incorporate suitable wordings with the restoration work so that the memorial shall also serve for those who died in World War II.

Until now the memorial has been solely for the First World War.


Adjusted for inflation, £118 in 1962 is around £2,400 in 2016 values. The number of letters re-cut is not known as no records were kept of this work. Adjusted for inflation, each letter at one shilling and twopence is around £1.20 in 2016.


From the minutes of the Corporation of Mitcham Volume 22 1962 to 1963

Finance Report 25th September 1962 page 295

Resolved
War Memorial, Lower Green –

(i) That the quotation of the Neonore Stone Cleaning Co., in the sum of £118, plus 1s. 2d. for the re-cutting of each letter, be accepted; and

(ii) That, while the restoration of the War Memorial is in progress, the Borough Engineer be authorised, in consultation with the Chairman and Town Clerk, to incorporate suitable additional writing to those that died in World War II.

Finance Report 15th January 1963, page 634

War Memorial, Lower Green – The Borough Engineer submitted the following report:-

11th January, 1963

To the Chairman and Members of the Finance, Rating and Valuation Committee
Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen,

War Memorial, Lower Green

I have to report that the cost of providing an additional tablet referring to the dead of the second world war is £28.

Yours obediently,
J. W. Turner,
Borough Engineer and Surveyor.
Resolved, That the report be received.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Borough Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Caxton Cottages

Lower Green West. Not listed.

Photo taken May 2016

Photo taken May 2016

Occupants
From the minutes of the Mitcham Parish council
Volume 12 April 1914 to March 1915
Public Health and Burials
Page 155

Grave purchased by Emily Dolan of 2, Caxton Cottages, Lower Green.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Parish Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

1902 Defective Drainage

From the minutes of the Croydon Rural District Council
Volume 8
1902 to 1903
Mitcham Parochial
29th April 1902
page 67

11. DEFECTIVE DRAINAGE.

—Inspector Rabbetts submitted the following reports upon the defective drainage of certain .premises in the parish of Mitcham :-

18, BELGRAVE ROAD.—That he had found a vent pipe at these premises not connected to the drain, and that several of the pipes were broken. The owner, on being communicated with, had done something, but had covered up the work without giving him an opportunity of inspecting. He, however, proposed making a further test.

“ASSANDUNE,” “IVY COTTAGE,” AND “ELM COTTAGE.” —That, in accordance with the authority given him, he had entered upon the above premises, and found the drains at ” Assandune” and “Elm Cottage” to be defective. The drainage of “Ivy Cottage ” appeared to be tolerably good.

Resolved, That Mr. Rabbetts, Inspector of Nuisances, be authorised to serve notices on the undermentioned owners requiring them to abate the nuisances and to remedy the sanitary defects in the undermentioned premises, in accordance with the entries in the Report Book of the Inspector of Nuisances:-

Name and Address of Owner Situation of Premises.
Clark, Mr.,12, Rowley Road, Lewisham “Assandune,” Lower Green West
Bayley, Mr. (occupier) “Elm Cottage,” Lower Green West

BRUNSWICK Villas, Robinson ROAD.—That it had been found necessary to open up the ground and examine the drains of these premises. The drains of Clifton Villa, adjoining this property, were connected to the same system, but he had not yet been able to examine them. He recommended that notices be served on the various owners requiring them to carry out certain works in order to abate the nuisances.

The Committee adjourned the consideration of this matter.


Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.