Tag Archives: Lewis Road

Lulworth Crescent

New road and housing built on site of the Standard Upholstery factory, 36 Lewis Road, in 1988/9. Planning permission 88/P1640 was approved for the :

redevelopment of site by the erection of 20 no. 3 bed houses 14 no. 1 bed flats and 9 no. 2 bed flats with associated parking and landscaping including construction of new link road between Lewis Road and Portland Road.

The new link road referred became an extension to Portland Road. After the Standard Upholstery company left, its factory buildings was known as the Standard Trading Estate.

Street map of Lulworth Crescent overlaid onto Standard Upholstery factory

Street map of Lulworth Crescent overlaid onto Standard Upholstery factory

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1903 : House Refuse Nuisance in Lewis Road

This report to the Mitcham Parochial Committee of the Croydon Rural District Council describes a parcel of land, formerly and orchard, which has been divided by two owners. A gravel pit, filled with water has dried out and is being used to dump household waste, leading to the nuisance complained of. The report describes the size of the land, who owns it and where houses were built.

This 1894 OS map shows a field, number 298, of the same size referred to in the report, and so could be Nicholl’s Orchard.

1894 OS map

1894 OS map

From the minutes of the
Croydon Rural District Council
Mitcham Parochial Committee
Volume VIII 1902 – 1903
21st July 1903
page 294

2. House Refuse: Lewis Road.

The Sub-committee appointed to consider and report upon the alleged nuisance caused by the deposit of house refuse on land in Lewis Road, occupied by Messrs. Reader and Cramp, submitted the following report:-

The piece of land in question is about 3.5 acres in extent, and was
formerly known as “Nicholls’ Orchard.” It has a frontage of about 230 ft
to Lewis Road, and a depth of something over 650 foot. The gravel was
excavated a few years ago from the whole of the land in question, with the
exception of a small piece in the south-west corner abutting on Lewis Road.
The piece of land has since been sub-divided, the western portion being
owned and occupied by Mr. George Reader, and the eastern portion being occupied by Mr. Cramp.

Mr. Reader has built a pair of cottages on the south west corner of his piece abutting on Lewis Road. There are two or three cottages on the other side of Lewis Road, near to the south east corner of the part occupied by Mr Cramp, but, generally speaking, this district is sparsely inhabited.

The filling up of both parts of this excavated gravel pit has apparently been going on for the past year or two in an irregular and unsystematic manner.
The materials used for filling consist of miscellaneous rubbish, a large part of which appears to be unobjectionable from a sanitary point of view (however unsightly it may be from the point of view of the landscape gardener). A certain proportion of it, however, no doubt consists of vegetable and other refuse, the decomposition of which under unfavourable conditions might produce malarious vapours and be injurious to health.
When the Sub Committee first visited the place on Saturday, the 20th June, it was flooded by the exceptional rains of the previous week; a large part was completely submerged, and the remainder was a sloppy bog.

As this moisture evaporated during the dry weather which followed, bad and unwholesome vapours were no doubt given off, but that was a state of things prevalent throughout the district after the abnormal rains, and was not peculiar to the piece of land under consideration.

When the land was revisited three weeks later a marked improvement was apparent. On Mr. Cramp’s part of the land there was still a deepish pool of some size at the further end from the road to which the filling in process has not yet extended, the water in which was discoloured and foul, and there were still some puddles of foul and stagnant water in certain hollows and depressions on Mr. Reader’s piece; but having regard to the distance from dwellings and the nature of the surroundings, there was nothing to take serious exception to.

Mr. Cramp had been continuing to bring in dust contractors dust-bin refuse, but following up a caution from the Sub-Committee, had had it covered fairly.

Mr. Reader had been taking in no more filling in of any kind, and made complaint of what he considered inequality of treatment, saying that Mr. Cramp had been permitted to continue to fill in with dust contractors dustbin clearings, whereas he (Reader) had been forbidden ; that in consequence the general level of Cramp’s piece was raised a foot or more higher than Reader’s, and the water was forced from Cramp’s on to Reader’s piece, causing the puddles before referred to.

As regards this complaint the Sub-Committee think there must have been some misunderstanding on Reader’s part, for it is manifestly desirable that both Reader and Cramp should be encouraged to fill in as rapidly as possible, so as to bring the surface of the land up to the normal level, and get rid of the pools of stagnant water from which malarial vapours may arise.

If this work of filling in is undertaken systematically from the frontage to Lewis Road with dust-bin clearings and other suitable materials, properly covered as the work goes on, the water which must gather in the hollows will be gradually driven further and further back from the roadway and the inhabited houses until it is got rid of altogether, and the land will be rendered fit for cultivation.

Both Mr. Reader and Mr. Cramp appear ready and willing to do this, which is manifestly to the advantage of their property, and this Sub-Committee recommends that the misapprehension under which Mr. Reader appeals to labour, as before stated, be removed by a proper intimation from this Committee, and that for the present no further action be taken.

G. Farewell Jones.
George Parker.
John Stickings.


Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Oakwood Avenue

Road off north side of Lewis Road, near the Church Road end.

undated photo of Oakwood Avenue

1913 OS map

1913 OS map

World War 1 Connections
From the Commonwealth War Graves Commission:

Rifleman Robert Langridge

Private Herbert Percy Andrews

Private Alfred Joseph Tracey

From the Surrey Recruitment Registers:

W G BRUNTON of 10 Oakwood Avenue, aged 25 Years 1 Months, Labourer. Conscripted on 23 November 1915 to the Royal Fusiliers (5th Batn).

T GODDING of 56 Oakwood Avenue, aged 31 Years 11 Months, Assistant. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 10 December 1915 to the Suffolk Regiment (1st Batn).

C F GOSNEY of 5 Oakwood Avenue, aged 18 Years 1 Months, Labourer. Joined on 8 April 1915 to the East Surrey Regiment.

R H HALL of 29 Oakwood Avenue, aged 37 Years 3 Months, Bus Inspector. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 12 December 1915 to the Royal West Surrey Regiment (3rd Batn).

G W HILLING of 40 Oakwood Ave Mitcham, aged 37 Years 11 Months, Clerk. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 13 May 1916 to the Army Veterinary Corps.

F INSTANCE of 25 Oakwood Avenue, aged 19 Years 8 Months, Labourer. Volunteered on 21 August 1915 to the Middlesex Regiment.

J A MANSELL of 47 Oakwood Avenue, aged 37 Years 2 Months, Agent Asst. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 11 May 1916 to the Royal Flying Corps.

F C MANSER of 19 Oakwood Avenue, aged 40 Years 5 Months, Telephone Operator. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 11 December 1915 to the Yorkshire & Lancashire Regiment.

L W MARTIN of 38 Oakwood Avenue, aged 34 Years 11 Months, Clerk. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 10 December 1915 to the Essex Regiment (4th Batn).

E A MINNS of 49 Oakwood Avenue, aged 38 Years 9 Months, Manager. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 7 December 1915 to the Durham Light Infantry (5th Batn).

J ROAKE of 13 Oakwood Avenue, aged 19 Years, Wireman. Volunteered on 19 November 1915 to the Royal Horse Artillery.

H SHARMAN of 38 Oakwood Avenue, aged 29 Years 1 Months, Motor Driver. Conscripted on 7 May 1917 to the Army Service Corps (mt).

G A SIVIOUR of 12 Oakwood Avenue, aged 25 Years 10 Months, Secretary. Conscripted on 11 December 1916 to the Royal Horse & Field Artillery.

C SMITH of 15 Oakwood Avenue, aged 37 Years 11 Months, Metal Worker. Conscripted on 10 December 1915 to the 3rd Training Reserve Batn.

T S STRAGNELL of 41 Oakwood Avenue, aged 35 Years 9 Months, Tarcutter. Conscripted on 10 December 1915 to the 63rd Rifles (naval Division).

J TAYLOR of 52 Oakwood Avenue, aged 17 Years 8 Months, Clerk. Conscripted on 7 February 1917 to the Army Service Corps (ht).

A TEDDER of 9 Oakwood Avenue, aged 30 Years 7 Months, Manager. Conscripted on 8 December 1916 to the Royal West Kent Regiment (3rd Batn).

H THOMAS of 14 Oakwood Avenue, aged 26 Years 8 Months, Chauffeur. Volunteered with the Derby Scheme on 12 December 1915 to the Army Service Corps (mt).

T C THORNTON of 17 Oakwood Avenue, aged 22 Years, Roundsman. Conscripted on 19 October 1916 to the Norfolk Regiment (2/6th Batn).


Occupants from 1915 street directory

from Lewis Road

WEST SIDE

1, Miss Louis LASENBY, shopkeeper
1A, Mrs GILBERT
3, Mrs GILL
5, George GOSNEY, estate office
7, George REYNOLDS
9, Arthur TEDDER
11, Henry Edward FOSTER
13, John William ROAKE
15, Charles SMITH
17, Alfred FRANKLIN
19, Frederick MANSER
21, Frederick WILLIAMS
25, Henry William INSTANCE
27, Henry DREWETT
29, Ernest Alfred BOUFFLER
31, Thomas STEPHEN
33, Joseph H WOODMANSEE
35, William GIDDINGS
37, Albert EVERITT
39, Robert Henry HALL
41, Thomas STRUGNELL
43, William MUSTOE
45, Harry Walter BRENNAN
47, James MANSELL, assistant insurance supt
49, Ernest MINNS
51, James REED
53, Arthur FOLEY
55, Albert Henry HENSHAW
57, Charles Edward PEARCE
59, Robert NEWMAN

EAST SIDE SIDE

2, Harold THOMAS, confectioner
4, Augustus STANSFORD
6, Bernard M WILLIAMSON
8, Edward Thompson THOMPSON
10, Frederick BRUNTON
12, George Albert SIVIOUR
14, Harold THOMAS
16, John Thomas COOPER
18, Thomas LEGG
20, William STOKES
22, Thomas Henry DYER
24, Albert William SLEIGH
26, Walter NIGHTINGALE
28, Edward Samuel DANSON
30, Isaac Edward ASHLEY
32, James HUDSON
34, William John SLATER
36, William George TANNER
38, Francis Edward KING
40, George William HILLING
42, David HORAN
44, Charles PURNELL
46, Harry COLLINS
48, William George CARTER
50, John Edward BARNARD
52, Joseph TAYLOR
54, Ernest ROGERS
56, Thomas GODDINGS
58, C PAYNE
60, Arthur John THOMPSON
60A, Henry FURRIER


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Farm Labourer’s High Finance

FARM LABOURERS HIGH FINANCE.

Mitcham Man’s Affairs.

At the Croydon Bankruptcy Court on Thursday, before the Registrar (Alderman J. E. Fox, J.P.), Henry William Seale, of Orchard-villa, Lewis-road, Mitcham, now described as a builder, came up for his public examination. There were some entertaining details. His unsecured liabilities amounted to £943 2s. 9d., with gross liabilities £3,215 13s. 9d. His assets were estimated at £5 9s. leaving a deficiency of £937 13s. 9d.

In answer to the Official Receiver, debtor explained that, he was in the first place a farm labourer, then he became a vegetable hawker, a general dealer, and a carman and contractor in turn. It was in the last capacity that he took premises in Lewis road, Mitcham, remaining there until 1908.

In 1905 he bought two acres of freehold land in Lewis-road. He had £200, and, borrowed £100 from his wife to purchase this. Financed by bankers, he built two houses – the house where he lived, and another which he sold for £200. They cost £180 – £200 to build.

Later, he built three more houses and a shop. He still had four houses left. On these he had taken a mortgage of £800 and then a second charge of £500.

His wife had earned money as a pig and poultry seller. Debtor had a contract for collecting dust with the Croydon Rural District Council, but he lost this in 1908, and, having lost this, he gave up his business, on which he was then losing, and sold his horses and carts. They fetched £60 at auction, but he only £40 from the sale. He had kept no books.

In reply to the Registrar’s suggestion that he must have made a good thing out of the pigs, as he owed so much for their food, debtor said that in an outbreak of swine fever several died, and 82 had to be killed. Some of these were not his, as he was feeding them for another person, but he paid the man compensation.

Answering another question from the Official Receiver, debtor said that his wife bought a piece of freehold land at Cheam for £35 and he built two houses on it, for which she paid. Another piece of land in Lewis-road she bought for £350 with the intention of erecting piggeries on it, but on his advice she had it dug up for 10,000 yards, as the subsoil was rich in sand. She sold it for 3s., 3s. 3d., and 3s. 6d. a yard. His wife had also bought freehold land in Arundel road, Cheam, for £150, and debtor built 13 houses on it for £150 each.

In May, 1914, debtor had at the most £40, and he purchased some freehold land in Gander Green-lane, Cheam where his wife has some property — for £230. He commenced to build seven houses on it, a firm who were going to buy them supplying £200 worth of timber. He only completed two houses, and the arrangements between the firm and himself fell through owing to the war. He had also received £750 from another man, who had agreed to pay him an advance of £150 on each house.

He had been insolvent since he gave up his business as cartage contractor, and had never succeeded in recovering himself. Every undertaking of his since 1906 had been a failure. For two months in 1914 he had run the Mitcham Timber and Building Supply Company, in Western-road. He had not mentioned this at first because he had overlooked it until he had found a book respecting the business. When he closed it down the timber was sold by auction for a about £26, of which debtor got nothing. He still owed for timber. He might have asked a Mr. Miller, who supplied him with timber, to find purchasers for him for the houses in Gander Green-lane for £1,300, and for those in Arundel-road for £2,900. He denied that when the bankruptcy proceedings started he told Mr. Miller he could do as he liked, as he hod arranged all his affairs and had no property. He had never behaved in that way to any creditor.

In answer to a solicitor who appeared on behalf of a creditor, debtor said that he had been married twenty-one years, and had lived at Carshalton. His wife had over £100 when she was married, but he did not know how much.

The examination was adjourned until February 25th.

Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, 22nd January, 1915

Ivy Cottage, Lewis Road

Also see Ivy Cottage on Lower Green West.

Summoned before the Croydon County magistrates on Saturday for keeping eleven dogs without licenses, Albert Smith, of Ivy Cottage, Lewis-road, Mitcham, said they only passed through his hands for training, the ultimate owners paying for the licenses. Defendant was fined £5 and costs, the alternative being fourteen days’ imprisonment.

Source: Dorking and Leatherhead Advertiser – Saturday 27 December 1913 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Robertson’s Pickle and Sauce Works Ltd

“Zalmo” Pickle Works
22 Lewis Road

1937 ad

1937 ad

In 2013, a long lost recipe for piccalilli was discovered.

Its closure in March 1969 was reported in the local newspaper, which referred to it as having been started 44 years previously, i.e. 1925.

Another small firm closes

Rising rates, inability to compete with giant supermarket and manufacturing concerns and wholesale business methods have driven another small firm to the wall.

A 44-year-old Mitcham factory, Robertson’s Pickle and Sauce Works Ltd., Lewis Road, have closed down and the owners have put the property up for sale.

A director, Mr Cyril Robertson, said this week:

“Most of my customers were small grocers – and with the advent of the supermarket they have been forced out of business. So I go down the drain too.

“Rates have risen over the past 12 years, from £56 a year to over £700.

“I can no longer get bottles for my produce – all the glass manufacturing is in the hands of four large concerns and they are only interested in mass production.”

Staff have reduced over the years, and when Robertson’s finally closed its doors in March only nine were declared redundant.

From a lifetime of working for himself in a £50,000 a year business Mr Robertson is now looking for a job.

“I’m too young to retire,” he said. “I’m only 62.”

People from the south coast and up as far as Reading will remember Robertson’s pickles, he added.

“They were the finest in the country – but then I suppose eating habits have changed too. People go out and eat more often – or just buy fish fingers to cook at home.”

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th June, 1969, page 1.

This 1952 OS map shows the pickle factory.

This aerial photo shows the factory in relation to nearby factories and houses.

1952

1952

After closure, a planning application was filed to use the site for the production of plastics. This gives the size of the single-storey works at 7,000 square feet.

From the minutes of the
Town Planning and Development Committee
31st July 1969

497. LEWIS ROAD, MITCHAM — MER. 595/69 — Robertson’s Pickle and Sauce Works Limited — (Section 43 Determination)

— The Borough Surveyor submitted an application for a determination under Section 43 of the Town Country Planning Act, 1962, as to whether the proposed use of Robertson’s Pickle and Sauce Works for the moulding of reinforced plastics involving the use of polyester resins and fibreglass would constitute or involve development requiring planning permission. He explained that the premises (of single-storey construction comprising approximately 7,000 square feet floor area) were situated at the rear of Nos. 12-20, Lewis Road, fronting an access road leading to the Lewis Road recreation ground; stated that they had been used for a considerable number of years for the pickling of vegetables and the making of sauces; and reported that, since the proposed use and the last use both fell within Class IV of the Town and Country Planning (Use Classes) Order, 1963, it was clear that express planning permission would not be required.

Resolved — That the Council determine and the applicant be informed that the use, as described, would not constitute or involve development requiring planning permission.

Source: Minutes of Proceedings of the Council and committees, London Borough of Merton, Volume 6 1969-70, page 355


1944 film footage by Bruce Robertson of V1 bomb damage in nearby Glebe Avenue.


Minutes of meetings held by the London Borough of Merton are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.