Tag Archives: Isaac Wilson

Events of 1932

From the Mitcham News & Mercury of 6th January 1933

It can be safely said of Mitcham, as of the majority of other places, that few regretted the passing of 1932, with its times of severe depression, but that everyone is looking forward confidence to enjoying better times in 1933. An important event early in the year was the decision of the Council for a petition for the incorporation of Mitcham as a borough. During the year Mitcham Common Conservators sanctioned public golf on the Common, and decided not to allow Sunday football. A new Rotary club for Mitcham was inaugurated in February, and in April Mr Joseph Owen gave £4,025, in addition to the site, for a public library. In November the new super-swimming baths were opened. The wedding of Mr Isaac Wilson, J.P., to Miss Elsie Evans, former matron of Wilson Hospital took place in October. The death-roll included Dr A.W. Harrison, Mrs S.J. Mount, the Rev. Alfred Grove, curate of the Parish Church, and Mrs Roberts, wife of the Rev. W.K.Roberts, vicar of St. Marks Church.

January

2 Frederick Thomas Mansfield (18) of Homewood Road, Mitcham, electrocuted at butcher’s shop in Church Road

12 Mitcham Council decide on petition for incorporation

15 Death of Mrs Florence Edith Trevelyan Juster, wife of Mr John Juster, undertaker, High Street, Colliers Wood, aged 59

18 Funeral of Mr Walker T. Davis, of Penge Road, South Norwood, an old-time Mitcham cricketer.

18 Death of Dr. Arthur William Harrison, of Park Road, Colliers Wood, aged 64

28 Mr and Mrs William White, of 144, High Street, Colliers Wood, golden wedding

February

7 Death of Mrs Mary Florence Downing, wife of Mr H. P. Burke Downing, a distinguished church organist of Colliers Wood

15 Death of Mrs Sarah Jane Mount, wife of Mr Harry Mount, J.P., of Church Road, Mitcham, aged 67

15 Inauguration of new Rotary Club for Mitcham

19 Death of Mr B C Moore (18) of Tynemouth Road, Mitcham, a promising footballer and cricketer

24 Death of the Rev. Alfred Grove, curate of the Mitcham Parish Church; aged 40

March

5 Funeral of Mr L. White, for 29 years chief sanitary inspector at Mitcham

29 Mitcham and Tooting Football Clubs amalgamate

April

15 Robbery of £660 from workmen’s hut at Figges Marsh

18 Death of Mr W R Boon, of Tamworth Park, aged 96

26 Mr Joseph Owen’s munificent gift of £4,025 towards Public Library, including site

26 Election of Mr W Carlton, J.P., chairman of Mitcham Council

May

3 Public golf course on Mitcham Common sanctioned by Conservators

June

1 Mitcham New Congregational Church in London Road, dedicated and opened

5 Mr Stanley G Barrows (31), an auxiliary fireman, found gassed at Edmund Road, Mitcham

6 Mr Ernest Burnell (52), of Prussia Place, Nursery Road, Mitcham, found hanging

18 Foundation stone laid of headquarters of 10th Mitcham (Christchurch) Scout Group, by Sir T. Cato Worsfold

22 Death of Mrs Jane Theresa Lewington, of the Catholic Presbytery, London Road

July

3 Mitcham Catholic’s procession

6 Record show at Mitcham Floral and Horticultural Society

13 Mrs Miriam Victoria Moore, aged 35, and her daughter, Denise Olive Moore, aged six, found gassed at Caesar’s Walk, Mitcham

18 New police boxes opened

26 Councillor S.L. Gaston created a Justice of the Peace

August

8 Mrs Sophie Garrett, aged 62, found murdered at Love Lane, Mitcham. Her husband, John William Garrett, aged 56, afterwards found guilty but insane

14 Marriage of two dwarfs at St Barnabas Church. Miss Dorothy Kathleen Griffiths, of Thirsk Road, Tooting Junction, 3ft. 10ins., and Vivian Pascoe, of Hammersmith, 4ft.

18 Mr and Mrs F. Jones, of Melrose Avenue, diamond wedding

18 Death of Mr George reynolds, an old showman at Mitcham Fair; aged 79

30 Destructive fire at Hill Farm, Bishopsford Road

September

18 Fire at Grosvenor Model Laundry, Colliers Wood, damage estimated at £1,200

October

4 Farewell and presentation to Mr F.C. Stone, head master of Lower Mitcham Boys’ School

November

2 No Sunday football on Mitcham Common decision by Conservators

12 Death of Mrs Roberts, wife of the Rev W. K. Roberts, vicar of St. Marks Church, Mitcham

28 Opening of Mitcham’s new super-swimming baths and dance hall

December

5 Mr and Mrs Isaac H. Wilson entertain Rotary Club of Mitcham

7 Opening of Shaftesbury Society’s meeting place in Gladstone Road, Mitcham

16 “Mercury’s” exclusive announcement of Mitcham’s first cinema, the Majestic

18 Mr and Mrs R. J. E. Wiss, of 89 Caithness Road, Mitcham, diamond wedding

22 Destructive fire at Bond Road, six cottages involved

23 Mr and Mrs A. E. Knight, of 339 Church Road, golden wedding

23 Mr Ronald Arthur Keeble (20), fell 80ft. to death from dome of Eyre Smelting Works, Colliers Wood

Sydney Gaston

1937 mayor of Mitcham, full name Sydney Leonard Gaston.

Born 1882, died 18th March 1945. His wife, Constance Edith Gaston, died 22nd September, 1958, aged 74.

His son John Sydney Gaston, died 30th July 1943, aged 21. He was a pilot with the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve, 102 Squadron. He is buried in Hamburg cemetery in Germany. Source: Commonwealth War Grave Commission.

In 1920 he was the first editor of the by the North Mitcham Improvement Association magazine The Sentinel. The May 1949 issue said about him that

He was a man of letters, a musician, an elecutionist and amateur actor, a gardener and a cook. His speciality as a cook was making cakes. He was a wise councillor and an orator. He became chairman of the U.D.C. and Mayor of the Borough, a County Councillor and Chairman of the Bench of Magistrates. No one went to 61 Melrose Avenue or, later 2 Garden Avenue for advice, on any subject under the sun, without being helped and impressed by his knowledge. Truly a guide, counsellor and friend.

To buy number 2 Garden Avenue, he borrowed £600 from the Mitcham Urban District Council in 1924 which provide loans under the Small Dwellings Acquisition Act, 1899. R.M. Chart had valued the property at £810. Source: page 705, Volume IX, UDC Minutes, Finance and General Purposes Committee, 15th April, 1924.

Sydney Gaston became chairman of the Mitcham Magistrates in 1939 when Sir Isaac Wilson resigned from the position. Source : Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Friday 27 October 1939

SIR ISAAC WILSON RESIGNS CHAIRMANSHIP OF MITCHAM MAGISTRATES

Ald. Gaston The New Chairman

Sir Isaac H, Wilson, of The Birches, Mitcham Green, has retired from the position of chairman of the Mitcham magistrates, which he has held for several years.

The announcement was made by Alderman A. Mizen, the senior magistrate, at the opening of the Court in Mitcham Town Hall on Monday morning. The other magistrates present were Alderman S. L. Gaston, who has been chosen by his fellow magistrates to succeed Sir Isaac, Alderman J. Fitch, Mr. Harry Mount and Mrs. Ransom. Alderman Mizen said Sir Isaac resigned the chairmanship and also the deputy chairmanship at Croydon, at a meeting of the Bench on Friday. Alderman Gaston had been appointed to succeed him in both positions.

I congratulate my colleague on the honour that has come to him.” the alderman added. and we all feel sure that the business of the court will be conducted faithfully and well, as in the past, under his chairmanship.”

Mr. Ingle, Deputy Clerk, associated Mr. N. C. Gillett. the Clerk, and himself with what Alderman Mizen had said. While they regretted the loss of Sir Isaac Wilson they welcomed Alderman Gaston. Both had been members of the Bench for many years.

Mr. J. S. Stevens spoke similarly for the legal profession.

Alderman Gaston said they all regretted that Sir Isaac Wilson had found it necessary, through the passing of time, to give way to younger man. His shoes would be difficult to fill, but he (Alderman Gaston) would do his best.

Alderman Gaston then took the chair, Sir Isaac Wilson, who was not present, has not resigned his position as a magistrate. He is over seventy years of age.

Merton Memories Photos

1937
1938 crowning the May Queen
1938 presenting medal to fireman
1939 with wife


The Sentinel magazines by the North Mitcham Improvement Association are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

How Coal Gas is Made

From
Mitcham News & Mercury
12th May, 1933

“The Manufacture of Gas” was the subject of a very interesting address given, at the weekly meeting of the Rotary Club of Mitcham, held on Monday at the “White Hart” Hotel, Mitcham.

The speaker, was Rotarian Edward Pellew-Harvey, of the Wandsworth and District Gas Co., and a member of the Mitcham Club, and he explained that the art of coal gas manufacture is considerably over a century old.

After dealing with the history of the production of coal he said that at the present time In the United Kingdom alone there are some 1,700 separate concerns promoted for the manufacture a gas. Of these 931 are operated under statutory powers, some 619 being owned by companies and 313 by local authorities. The capital employed by the statutory concerns is approximately £140,000,000. The total annual production of gas in the United Kingdom is approximately 300,000,000,000 cubic feet, which is distributed to 8,000,000 individual consumers through 40,000 miles of street mains.

MITCHAM’S RETORTS.

The following is briefly, he added, the process of gas making. The coal is placed in numerous hermetically sealed fire clay or silica containers called retorts which are heated to a temperature of approximately 2,000 degrees F. by a mixture of furnace gas and air, which circulates round the retorts. There is practically no limit to the number of retorts used. At the Mitcham Works there are 192 working continually, each retort containing 12 cwt of coal, which remains in the retort for 12 hours, after which all the gas has been extracted from the coal, and approximately 9 cwt of coke left. Another charge is placed in the retort, which again remain for a period of 12 hours. From the foregoing figures it will be seen that at the Mitcham Works approximately 200 tons of coal per day are used for gas production.

Subsequently the gas is drawn away by means of a rotary pump, called an exhauster, through a series of condensers, which cool the gas to atmospheric temperature, and in so doing a portion of tar is recovered in the form of the dark thick liquid which is well known. From the condensers the gas travels through a series of cast iron or
steel rectangular vessels known as scrubbers, where, by washing, the ammonia is released, the final liquid, consisting of water and ammonia, being termed ammoniacal liquor.

A POISONOUS GAS.

From the scrubbers the gas passes through a series of cast iron boxes filled with oxide of iron, or ferric oxide, which extracts the sulphurated hydrogen. This gas being a poisonous one, has by law to be totally eliminated from the finished gas. The gas cleaned and purified, is now ready for use by the consumer, and is then metered and stored in the gas holder until required.

One ton of coal carbonised at a gas works yields coal gas, and the following main by-products, which in turn yield many valuable constituents. By distilling chemically the various oils contained in crude coal tar the following products are obtained: Dyes, perfumes and essences, explosives, chemicals used in medicine and surgery, such as anaesthetics, antiseptics and disinfectants; aperients, laxatives and emetics; photographic chemicals; wood preservatives, benzol, etc.

The cost of soot to the nation is tremendous. Manchester’s laundry bill, for instance, is £290,000 a year more than it would be if the air were clean. During heavy fogs, intensified by smoke, traffic is disorganised; in 27 days of fog during recent rears the ‘buses lost 400,000 working miles. But the damage which is most obvious to the general public is that done to our buildings. Soot and acid in the air involve the country in an expenditure of about £120,000 a year on the repair of Government buildings alone. It Is estimated that in London the financial loss due to smoke is nearly £7,000,000 a year.

Britain’s brightest days in recent years continued the speaker, were during the coal strike of 1926, when the air became clearer and purer than it has been observed within living memory. The fact is worth recalling, for today of the 33,000,000 tons of coal burned in Britain every year for domestic purposes about 3,200,000 tons pollute the air in the form of smoke and soot.

Smoke and soot are easily preventable, and the responsibility for polluting the air lies with each citizen. By taking advantage of the use of a smokeless fuel we can individually set a example, and to that extent give the sun a sporting chance of transmitting to us its health-giving rays. It is now a well-established fact that the ultra-violet rays of the sun, which are essential to our well-being, are shut up by the smoke clouds which hover continually over our big cities. On every square mile of our large towns there is a continuous soot fall, amounting in some cases to an annual deposit of hundreds of tons.

EMPLOYMENT GIVEN.

The magnitude of the industry may be judged by the following figures:

113,000 people are regularly employed in the gas industry;
the capital invested in the industry is about £200,000,000.
18,000,000 tons of coal are carbonised annually in British gas works;
the production of this coal gives employment to about 67,000 mine workers;
10,000,000 consumers regularly use some 1,000 million therms of gas a year;
50,000 miles of mains carry this fuel unfailingly to them;
7,000,000 British housewives cook by gas;
three out of every four doctors all over the country use gas fires;
four out of every five nursing homes and three out of
every four hospitals use gas for heating;
altogether the medical profession accounts for about 100,000 gas fires;
3,000 trades use gas for an average of seven processes in each;
the by-products obtained yearly from British gas works include 12,000,000 tons of coke, 120,000 tons of sulphate of ammonia, 215 million gallons of tar.

The speaker concluded by inviting the members of the club to visit the gas works at Mitcham on May 27.

Rotarian C. H. Parslow tendered thanks to the speaker for his excellent address and on behalf of the club accepted his kind invitation to visit the works of the gas company. Rotarian Riley Schofield presided, in the absence of the president, Rotarian Isaac H. Wilson, who was attending the Rotary Conference at Scarborough in company with the two vice-presidents, Rotarians Gauntlett and Cole.

The chairman welcomed guests from Wallington and Croydon Clubs.

Langdale Avenue

A cul-de-sac road, off of London Road north of the telephone exchange, with its southern, closed end at Cold Blows. Possibly built early 1900s.

There is a public footpath next to number 35 on the east side of the road that leads to Commonside West near the Three Kings Pond.

From a postcard dated 1916. Houses numbered, from right to left, 22 to 34, with junction with Elmwood Road out of shot in the right.

Royal Mail postcode lookup shows 87 addresses, and 4 postcodes, CR4 4AE/F/G/J.

1953 OS map

From the minutes of the Croydon Rural District Council
Volume IX 1903 – 1904
7th May 1903
page 72

No. 2506, Harding, J., 12 houses, Langdale Avenue, Mitcham

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council
Highways, New Streets and Buildings, and Lighting Committee
Tuesday, 8th June, 1926
Page 120

Plans submitted for approval

No. 808
Applicant: Mr. Isaac Wilson, The Hut, Commonside East
Nature and Situation:

Amended layout for five houses, Langdale Avenue (for subsidy)


World War 1 Connections
Private W Bassett

Private V W Jones

News Articles

1921 suicide in Langdale Avenue explained

Lamp Explodes

A gas street lamp in Langdale Avenue, Mitcham, exploded on Thursday last week – startling people in nearby homes. A jet of flame flared from a broken pipe until Gas Board engineers arrived. Firemen stood by.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 5th June, 1959, page 1.

House Names
6, Iveldene – from the 1935 Mitcham Cricket Club yearbook


Minutes of meetings held by the Croydon Rural and Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.