Tag Archives: Fair Green

Hutton’s Fish Shop

2 Upper Green West

fishmongers

Listed in 1954 and 1971 telephone directories as F.A. Hutton. The 1954 phone number was MIT 1549.

The original shop was hit by a bomb during World War 2. A single storey shop was rebuilt, see 1962 clip below.

clip from 1962 photo on Merton Memories, copyright London Borough of Merton

1952 OS map

The pre-war shop.

clip from undated photo on Merton Memories, copyright London Borough of Merton, shows the shop before it was bombed in WW2,


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

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Speedway Shoe Repair Service

Listed in the 1971 telephone directory at 5 Upper Green West, phone 01-648 8821.

clip from 1962 photo on Merton Memories, copyright London Borough of Merton.

1952 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1961 obituary of Jack Gillard, newsvendor at Fair Green since 1920

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 10th March 1961

NEWSVENDOR JACK DIES

Sixty-nine-year-old Jack Gillard, who died suddenly in hospital on Tuesday (7th March 1961), was one of Mitcham’s more famous landmarks.

For 41 years, he had sold newspapers at Fair Green, and was known by thousands of local people.

Mr. Gillard, of Henry Prince Estate, Earlsfield, had been in poor health for some time and had not been at his usual pitch for about four months.

He often talked about the changes in the district since he became a newsvendor in 1920.

“When I first moved in to Mitcham – I lived in Love Lane – it was like a small country village,” he would recall.

And he remembered shouting the big news over the years . . . The General Strike, the R101 disaster, the outbreak of war, the first atom bomb over Japan . . .

Three years ago Jack had a serious accident and later a leg was amputated. He was fitted with an artificial limb.

For years he tried to persuade Mitcham Council to let him put up a covered stand, but was never successful.

Fair Green Bandstand

Built in 1924 and demolished in ????, the bandstand at the Fair Green was at the western end, across the road from the Nags Head pub.

photo taken possibly before the 1930s

From Mitcham Urban District minutes in July 1924, the bandstand was built by Messrs McFarlane, Mr Hann connected the drainage to the culvert, and Sayers & Son was awarded the contract to paint it with anti-corrosive paint, for £20 18s. The County of London Electric Supply Company was paid £28 16s. for the installation of lighting for the bandstand.

The nearby Zion Congregational chapel objected to a bandstand being built. The council responded that it would

do all in their power to endeavour to secure quietude during the hours of service at the Church.

Source: council minutes 9th May 1924, page 24.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

J.K. Harvey, chemists

Early 1900s view of the chemist shop of J.K. Harvey in York Place, Fair Green. This clip is from Merton Memories photo 30338 (c) London Borough of Merton

Early 1900s view of the chemist shop of J.K. Harvey in York Place, Fair Green. This clip is from Merton Memories photo 30338 (c) London Borough of Merton

Chemist closes after 88 years

An old-established chemist’s shop at Fair Green, Mitcham, closed at the end of June.

Founded in 1878, the business was taken over in 1943 by the late John Kentish Harvey, a well known local man who was for many years church warden at St Mark’s, Mitcham.

After his death in 1955 the business was run by his two sons, Mr John Kentish Harvey and Mr Lawrence Reginald Harvey, Langdale Road, Mitcham.

But in recent years there has been a shortage of qualified pharmacists and the firm unable to obtain a permanent one had to close down.

Mr J.K. Harvey and Mr L.R. Harvey, who both work in the City, will still be living in Mitcham.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 22nd July 1966.

Anti-German Riots after sinking of the Lusitania

Anti-German riots broke out on the evening of Wednesday 12th May, 1915, in Tooting and the next day in Mitcham, in response to the sinking of the ship Lusitania.

ANTI-GERMAN RIOTS

Bakers’ Windows Broken

Several Arrests

The scenes of violence which have marked the public feeling against enemy aliens which has been aroused as a result of the Lusitania crime broke out in the neighbourhood on Wednesday evening. At Tooting Broadway a crowd commenced to assemble about 8 o’clock, but for some time it reached very large dimensions. Towards nine o’clock the gathering became more dense, and it was obvious that the baker’s shop owned by Mr P. Jung was in danger of assault. The police, who were reinforced, did their utmost to keep the crowd on the move, and prevented any congregating immediately outside the shop. Meanwhile Mr Jung closed his business as a precautionary measure, but this move was only greeted with jeers. Shortly before ten o’clock a loud crash of glass told that at least one missile had found the mark, a success which was boisterously cheered. The police continued to force the crowd to the opposite side of the road, but the passing of the trams enabled the mob to make some advances, which, however, were fortunately checked.

Every now and again more glass was smashed, and eventually there was very little left of the huge plate-glass windows which have helped to make Mr Jung’s shop such an attractive place of business. When the police did actually see a person throwing he was promptly arrested. Some ugly rushes were the result, and it is a matter for congratulation that no very serious conflicts occurred between the police and the public.

While the guardians of the law were straining every endeavour to cope with the crowd at the Broadway, now numbering some 2,000, a few persons commenced paying attention to the Hygienic Bakery, owned by a German, and situated further down the High-street, opposite the “Mercury” Offices. The roller shutters were lowered, but some spirits more determined than the rest wrenched them away from their fastenings, and with considerable noise they fell to the ground. Without loss of time a brick was hurled at the window with an accuracy of aim somewhat remarkable for a member of the fair sex, who made the claim of having drawn first blood. Other bricks and stones followed in quick succession with more or less precision, and one windows had hardly a particle of glass left in.

THE “SPECIALS” ARRIVE

At about 11 o’clock a strong contingent of special constables appeared on the scene, and were accorded a very mixed reception. The Tooting section was strengthened by a force from Mitcham, numbering about 70, under Inspector G.J. Poston. They were divided into sections, and did most useful work in helping the regular police to disperse the crowds.

Other shops were attacked in Garratt-lane, and all suffered in a like manner and to a similar extent. Police remained on guard all night and the next day, and as soons as carpenters could be procured the premises were boarded up, and in some cases the German traders packed up their goods and chattels and cleared off with all possible despatch.

ANTI-GERMAN DEMONSTRATIONS AT MITCHAM

Early last evening a crowd, which gradually swelled until about 8 o’clock, when it numbered several hundred persons, assembled at the Fair Green for the purpose of expressing indignation at the recent murders on the high seas.

Proceeding in the direction of the Parade, the crowd halted in front of the jeweller’s shop tenanted by Mr J. B. Rompel, a naturalised German.

Their attitude was distinctly menacing, and but for the prescence of a large force of Special Constabulary they would, no doubt, have vented their feelings in no unmistakeable manner. After some jeering and hooting the police dispersed the crowd.

With the exception of one man, whose head was cut with a stone, no damage or injury took place.

Source: Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, Friday, 14th May, 1915, page 4.

A photo of special constable recruited during the First World War is on Merton Memories.

Gaydons

Menswear shop, was at 11 Upper Green East, ‘facing the clock tower’ as stated in their ads

1972 ad

1972 ad

Text of ad:

GAYDONS
of
MITCHAM
(facing Fair Green Clock Tower)

for

MENSWEAR
YOUTHSWEAR
and NOW
BOYSWEAR

Telephone 648 2179

Also at:

130 Streatham Vale 764 2526
91 Streatham Hill 674 6479
3 Warwick Way, Victoria 834 4187

Ad from 1952:

1952 ad

1952 ad

Text of ad:

GAYDONS LTD.

MAN’S SHOPS

invite your inspection of their latest ranges

Sport Jackets = Smartly tailored in Single or Double Breasted styles.
Sports Trousers = Gaberdine or worsted in attractive new shades.
Suits = To suit all occasions. Expertly cut and tailored.
Raincoats = In cotton or wool Gaberdine.
Shirts & Ties = In modern and traditional styles.

For Men of Faultless Taste

Local Branch
11 UPPER GREEN – MITCHAM (Facing Clock Tower)

Also at
TOOTING
STREATHAM
VICTORIA
KINGSTON