Tag Archives: Church Road

Spring Gardens, Church Road

A terrace of eight houses that were on the western side of Church Road, at the north corner with Aberdeen Road.

1894 OS map

Occupants in the 1896 street directory

1,John SEARS
2,Mrs SMITH
3,Mrs RUSSELL
4,James WHITE
5,Charles WESTERN
6,Joseph SIMMONS
7,Charles EDWARDS
8,Thomas MURRAY

Occupants in the 1904 street directory

1,Edward THOMPSON
2,Mrs SMITH
3,Mrs RUSSELL
4,William HUSSEY
5,Charles WESTERN
6,Alfred KNIGHT
7,Walter WATLING
8,Charles SIVIOUR

The terrace is shown on the 1911 OS map but not listed in the Kelly street directory for that year.

1911 OS map

The terrace of six houses to the north, on the same side of Church Road, is listed as Marrianne Cottages.

The terrace is not shown in the 1952 OS map:

1952 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

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Marrianne Cottages

Terrace of houses that was on the western side of Church Road, south of Phipps Terrace and north of Aberdeen Road.

Occupants in the 1911 street directory
Going from north to south.

6,William SEARS
5,E T BROADBRIDGE
4,Frederick BALDWIN
3,William Thomas FRANCIS
2,Henry James BATT
1,Frederick William TAYLOR

Possibly this terrace of six houses, numbered 369 to 359, as shown on this 1952 OS map:

1952 OS map

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Foster’s Autocentre, 96 Church Road

Garage and MOT business at 96 Church Road, occupying premises of former varnish factory of G. Purdom.

From 1980s? to 2018?

Photo taken March 2018. On the left is the footpath Foxes Path, the Wheatsheaf.

Photo taken March 2018, looking north.

In the 1971 telephone directory, the company at this address was Bromhead & Denison, “Chems and Mins”, number 01-648 4494. Their name can be seen on this clip from Merton Memories:

clip from merton Memories photo Mit_​Work_​Industry_​8-1 copyright London Borough of Merton.

Renamed as B & D Clays and Chemicals Ltd., the company moved to Western Road in around 1983, according to a person on the Facebook Mitcham History group. This company currently trades from Willow Lane according to Companies House, which says the company incorporated in 1974.

1932 : Young man electrocuted while washing his employer’s van

While washing his employer’s van, Frederick Mansfield, aged 18, was electrocuted. From the newspaper reports it would appear that he grabbed an electric light flex, that didn’t have a light bulb in it, and probably didn’t realise that the switch was on. Electricity shorted from the lamp socket across his body to the wet floor on which he was standing.

The story was syndicated nationally and appeared in a number of regional newspapers. Here’s one article from The Scotsman:

LAD ELECTROCUTED

A remarkable fatality occurred at Mitcham on Saturday night, when Frederick Thomas Mansfield (18), a butcher’s assistant, of Homewood Road, Mitcham, was electrocuted while washing a motor car.

Mansfield and another boy were cleaning the car at the rear of the premises of Edwin Birch & Sons, butchers, Church Road, and were using a “flex” attached to the electric light installation of the car for illuminating purposes. Hearing a shout, the manager went to the spot, and found Mansfield lying on his back with the flex in his hand. The manager knocked the wire from the boy’s hand, but when a doctor arrived Mansfield was found to be dead.

Source: The Scotsman – Monday 04 January 1932 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

At the inquest it was added that the vehicle being washed was his employer’s van.

It was stated at an inquest yesterday on a Mitcham butcher’s assistant, Frederick Mansfield (18), who was electrocuted while washing his employer’s motor van, that he had a flex in his right hand, and must have got the best part of 200 volts through his body. Dr. Henry Love said that Mansfield had exceedingly large thymus gland, which was a contributory cause.

Source: Hartlepool Northern Daily Mail – Thursday 07 January 1932 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

The postmortem would likely to have been performed in the Mortuary Chapel in the parish churchyard. This building was demolished some time after the formation of the London Borough of Merton in 1965.

The 1930 commercial directory gives E. Birch & Sons, butchers at numbers 36 and 38 Church Road.

E. Birch & Sons, butchers

Ad from September 1914


Text of ad:

Messrs. E. BIRCH & SONS,

Pork and Beef Butchers.

New Premises: CENTRAL MARKET, LONDON RD, MITCHAM.

It will pay YOU to give us a call. All goods of our own manufacture from
ENGLISH material. Note the HOME KILLED PORK of Finest Quality.

E. BIRCH & Sons,

36-38, Church Road and 1, London Road. Mitcham. 133, High
Street, Merton; Beddington Corner.

Phones: 817 Mitcham; 1283 Wimbledon.

1953 OS map

In the 1930 commercial directory, E Birch & Sons was listed at 36 & 38 Church Road and also 274 London Road.

In the 1952 chamber of commerce list, shown as S.E. Birch, 36 Church Road.

Listed in the 1954 telephone directory as E. Birch & Sons, 36 Church Road, phone number MITcham 0817.

A photo from the London Metropolitan archives of 1967 shows 36 Church Road still as family butchers, with the name F. Johnson.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1879 : A Question of Sobriety

From the Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 03 May 1879 via the British Newspaper Archive

A QUESTION OF SOBRIETY.—PUBLICAN’S AMENITIES.

— At the Croydon Petty Sessions on Saturday, Mr. Parkes Hope, landlord of the Bath Tavern Mitcham, was summoned for serving intoxicated persons with liquor on his premises on the 16th April; and Alfred Stevens, James Stevens, and Joseph Munt were summoned for being found drunk on the premises. Mr. Dennis appeared for the defendants.

— P.-c. 382 W stated that on the 14th April he was on duty in Church-road, Mitcham, when he saw James Stevens drunk and incapable. He also saw Alfred Stevens and Joseph Munt, who were drunk, but not incapable. The two latter were supporting James Stevens between them. Witness saw them enter the Star beerhouse, Church-road, and heard them call for beer. Mr. Chapman, the landlord, however, refused to serve them. They then proceeded to Rock-terrace, and he saw them enter the Bath Tavern. Alfred Stevens called for a pot of beer, and was served by the landlord. Witness saw Alfred Stevens and Munt drink from the pot. A disturbance arose between them, and Alfred Stevens and Munt dragged James Stevens from the bar, and after great difficulty succeeded in getting him home. Witness told the landlord that he should have to report the case, when Mr. Hope replied that he had drawn the beer himself, but did not know that the parties were drunk when they came in.

— William Chapman, landlord of the Star beerhouse, gave evidence as to the elder defendant, James Stevens, coming into his house alone on the evening in question. He was very drunk, and witness refused to serve him, and tried to get him out of the house. While he was doing Alfred Stevens and Munt came into the house, and assisted him in getting the old man out of the house. —Neither Alfred Stevens nor Munt were intoxicated.

— Mr. Dennis said his answer to the case was that on the day in question the younger Stevens drove his master to Thames Ditton, and on his return to Mitcham learnt that his father, who was upwards of 70 years of age, was in the Star beerhouse, drunk. He went there and got his father out, and was assisted by Munt in getting him home. On their way, having to pass the Bath Tavern, they went in, and having placed the old man on a seat, they called for a pot of beer, which the two drank between them, but the old man did not have a drop.

— Mr. Hope, landlord of the Bath Tavern, Alfred Stevens, and several others were called as witnesses, and their evidence confirming the above statement, James Stevens was fined 10s. and 7s. costs. The other summonses were dismissed.