Tag Archives: Chart

Mitcham Rifle Club before 1914

BRIGHTON RAILWAY v. MITCHAM. Won by Brighton. Scores : Brighton Railway.—P. Jackson, 99; F. Nightingale, 98; P. Bates, 97; C. Streeter, 96; E. Fox, 96; G. Burt, 94 ; G. Clayton, 94; J. Fox, 93—total, 767. Mitcham Railway.— A. Dalziel, 96; J. Baker, 95 ; J. Rompel, 92; A. Baker, 91; S. Chart, 88; J. White, 88; W. Tullett, 87; H. White, 87—total, 724.

Source: Croydon Chronicle and East Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 24 February 1912 from the British Newspaper Archive

MITCHAM R.C. v. “OLD BOYS” HIGH SCHOOL.

At Mitcham. Scores :
Mitcham. — L. W. Munday, 97; H. W. White, 96; J. B. Rompel, 96; J. A. Baker, 95 ; J. D. Clarke, 95; A. Dalziel, 95; J. White, 93; R. Robinson, 93. Total, 760.

“Old Boys.” – C. W. Hall, 100; D. Mc- Kerchar, 99; L. E. Hall, 97 ; L. Jones, 95; R. K. Batstone, 95; R. E. English, 94; G. L. Bailey, 91; A. Brown, 83. Total, 754.

Source: Croydon Chronicle and East Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 06 April 1912 from the British Newspaper Archive

“W” DIVISION POLICE v. MITCHAM

— Won by “W” Division Police. Scores : Police.—P.c Baker. 85; P.s. Blacklaws, 92; P.c. Wilson, 93; P.c. Talbot, 99; P.c. Cleaver, 94; P.c. Wilkie. 100; P.c. Alder, 93; P.c. Jackson, 92. Total, 750.

Mitcham — Mr. Guyatt, 84; Mr. J. White, 81; Mr. J. B. Rompel, 86; Mr. J. A. Baker, 90; Mr. A. Jenner. 92; Mr. Philpot, 92; Mr. J. White, 84; Mr. S. Chart, 82. Total, 691.

ADDISCOMBE R.C. v. MITCHAM R.C.

— Won by Addiscombe.

Scores:-
Addiscombe. — G. Foster, 95; A. F. Knight, 93; W. E. Harvey, 96; A. Dixon, 99; H. C. Pressland, 97; A. Cotterell, 94; T. Hooker, 95; F. C. Burgess, Si. Total. 763.

Mitcham. — Philpot , 93; Munday, 97; A. Jenner. 90; J. B. Rompel. 89: J. A. Baker, S. Chart, 85; G. Wyatt, 85; J. White, 94. Total, 704.

Source: Croydon Chronicle and East Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 28 October 1911 from the British Newspaper Archive

Advertisements

1847 Pub Licensing

Saturday. -€” (Before Sir H.. Bridges, Chairman, S. H. Lucas, W. A. Wilkinson, and T. Byron, Esqrs.)

This being the annual licensing day, the court was much crowded, considerable anxiety being felt to the result of the applications for new licenses. The police from the various districts were present, order of the Bench, to afford information as to the manner in which the various public-houses had been conducted during the past year.

The number of public-houses in this district are follows-€”
Parish of Croydon 45,
Carshalton 5,
Coulsdon 3,
Addington 1,
Beddington 1,
Mitcham 14,
Morden 2,
Penge 2,
Wallington 3.

The evidence of the police being of a satisfactory nature, the whole of the old licenses were renewed.

The license of the Windmill, Croydon-common, was transferred from Mr. Hierons to Mr. Jas. Cross; the Jolly Sailor, Norwood, from Mrs. Eaton to Mr. T. Pascall.

Application for Wine and Spirit Licenses.

– €”The first application was from Mr, John Watts, of the Castle, Gibbet-green. Mr. Childs, of the firm of Wire and Childs, solicitors, appeared in support of the application. he said that since he had been in court, he understood that an application for a license for a neighbouring house had been withdrawn, but that this application was to opposed.

Mr. Richards said he appeared on behalf of Mr. Strong, owner of the Red Deer beer-house, to oppose application.

Mr. Childs then stated his case at considerable length. This was the tenth application for license to this house. It was the third time Mr. Watts had applied he had kept the house three years a beer-house without the slightest complaint being alleged against him.

The memorial which had been presented to the magistrates bore the signatures many of the oldest and most respectable inhabitants of the neighbourhood. The premises are well built and commodious, and under all circumstances he prayed that the license might be granted.

Mr. Richards said he was not instructed to oppose this on pecuniary grounds, but Mr. Strong considered the time had not yet arrived when a public-house was required in this neighbourhood, he therefore withdrew his own application. The Castle was well enough for a beer house for wagoners to stop at, but would never attract the custom of respectable persons.

Mr. Childs ridiculed the idea of Mr. Strong being considered the guardian of the public interest in this neighbourhood. It was only two years ago that a license was applied for, for his own property, within quarter of a mile of the Castle. As to the respectability the premises, his clients were not ambitious ; they did not expect the patronage of the nobility and gentry tradesmen and even wagoners would do for them.

Mr. Raper applied for a license for a house at the Beulah Spa, Norwood. Mr. Childs, for the applicant, stated that the house was a boarding-house, and all the license was required for, was to accommodate the persons residing in the house. It was not intended to make it a general public-house.

Mr. Richards opposed it on behalf the inhabitants of Norwood, and presented a strongly signed memorial, which stated that in the opinion of the memorialists no such license was required.

Henry Gillingham applied for a licence. His house is situated on Westow-hill, Norwood. An opposing petition was put by Hugh Bowditch, of the Woodman public-house, Norwood; also one the same effect, from John Ledger, of the White Hart, Norwood. Applicant said it was twenty years since a licence had been granted to that part of Norwood, during which time, the inhabitants had nearly doubled ; he had many applications for spirits, but dare not sell them.

Mr. Wilkinson – €”Then you mean that persons come to your house to enjoy the fine prospect; the view makes them thirsty, and you cannot supply them with drink ? – €”Yes, sir.

Henry Henden applied for license for a beer-house known as the Prince of Wales, Merton-lane. Mr. Childs appeared for the applicant. He said there were several factories in the neighbourhood; the nearest public-house was the Victory, which is 745 yards distant; the next the Nag’€™s Head, 1200 yards. The persons engaged in the factories presented a petition supporting the application. The landlord of the Victory opposed the application. Mr. Wood, the brewer, he said, had built the house in opposition to him. The neighbourhood was anything but improving. Mr. Lowman, the Nag’€™s Head, and Mr. Gale, of the Red Lion, also opposed the application. The printers at the factories had not more than two days’ work a week throughout the winter.

Benjamin Marchant, of Tamworth-lane, in the parish of Mitcham, applied for a license. Mr. Child appeared for the applicant, and Mr. J. Drummond in opposition.

The house is situate in the lane opposite the work-house, at Mitcham-common. The clergyman at Mitcham had signed the petition for the application, which Mr. Childs considered to great and convincing fact.

A plan was put in, and Mr. Chart, of Mitcham, called to prove the signatures to the memorial. In cross-examination, he said many of the witnesses were not rate-payers, also that, the house was not in the high road. Witness afforded much amusement by his apparent determination to make out case, Mr. Drummond remarking that he was a famous hand at evading questions; he only wished he was as good at answering them.

Mr. Watney, in opposition, deposed that most of the signatures the memorial were those of working men.

Mr. Wilkinson – I should apprehend they are persons most likely to require it.

The Three Kings, Mitcham. – €”A case was then gone into, whether a license should be granted to this house. Mr. Hancock, who had kept it for 30 years, applied to have the license renewed in his name. A person named King also applied, saying he was the proper tenant. Hancock had a lease, which expired in December, 1846, but he refused to give up possession, and had been turned out. The Bench refused to grant the license to either party.

The Court was then cleared for the Bench to deliberate. After a quarter of an hour was again opened, when the Chairman announced that license would granted to John Watts, of the Castle, Gibbet-green, as will seen an advertisement in another part of this paper, and that the other applications were refused.

Source: South Eastern Gazette – Tuesday 09 March 1847 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

According to Montague in his book Mitcham Histories : 3 Pollards Hill, Commonside East and Lonesome, page 97, in the 1840s Benjamin Marchant was the occupier of The Phoenix, which was renamed the Horse and Groom in 1855.

Private Geoffrey Chart

DEATH OF PTE. CHART.

—Mr. R. M. Chart. C.A., is so well-known for many years’ work as surveyor to the old Rural District Council and as County Alderman, that the sympathy will be wide for the loss he has sustained in the death at the front of his son, Pte. Geoffrey Chart, who joined up on the outbreak of the Boer War, and after the campaign was over started in business in Cape Town. When this war commenced he again joined the Highlanders, and last spring came back for a few days to his old home. He was wounded in action on Sept. 21st, and hopeful news was sent as to his recovery, but he died Sept. 23rd. He was 36, and leaves a wife and two children. Alderman Chart has three other sons serving.

Source: Surrey Mirror – Friday 12 October 1917 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

ALD. CHART’S BEREAVEMENT.

Pte. Geoffrey Chart, South African Contingent, whose death on Sept. 23rd from wounds received on the 21st is reported, was the fourth son of Mr. Robert M. Chart, St. Mary’s, Mitcham, Alderman of the Surrey County Council, and chairman of the Small Holdings and Allotments Committee.

Source: Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 06 October 1917 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

From the Commonwealth War Graves Commission:

Rank: Private
Service No: 10196
Date of Death: 23/09/1917
Age: 36
Regiment/Service: South African Infantry, 4th Regiment
Grave Reference: I. E. 6.
Cemetery: Nine Elms British Cemetery, Poperinge, Belgium.
Additional Information: Son of Robert and Florence Chart, of St. Mary’s, Mitcham, Surrey, England; husband of Margaret Chart, of Limebrook Cottage, Bingham Street, Bangor, Co. Down, Ireland.

The Nine Elms British Cemetery contains 1,556 Commonwealth burials from the First World War.

According to Eric Mobtague, in his Mitcham Histories : 1 The Cricket Green, page 105, St. Mary’s was the home of Robert Masters Chart from 1911 until his death in 1942. The house was near the old Methodist church, on the eastern side of the Cricket Green, and was demolished in the 1950s.

This image, part of a 1903 postcard, shows the old Methodist church and some houses next to it, which may include St Mary’s, where the road Chart Close is today.

c. 1903

c. 1903

1859 Auction of Church Living

WEDNESDAY.

Next Presentation.

MESSRS. CRAWTER WILL SELL BY AUCTION, at Garraway’s Coffee House. ’Change Alley, Cornhill, on Wednesday, March 16th, 1859, at one o’clock precisely, the NEXT PRESENTATION to the desirable LIVING OF MITCHAM, in the County of Surrey, only 8 miles from London, and 3 from Croydon Market Town, with the advantage of Railway communication to the City or West End in a very healthy locality, and improving neighbourhood.

The income is derived from commuted rent charge in lieu of tithes, and nearly 18 Acres of Glebe Land, with the Vicarage House. &c., estimated to produce in the gross together about £670 per annum.

The Glebe Lands can viewed on application to Mr. Wm. Hills, Church-street, Mitcham ; the Vicarage House to be viewed by cards only from the Auctioneers, and with the consent of the present incumbent.

Particulars may be had ten days before the sale of Mr. Chart, Vestry Clerk, Upper Mitcham; of Messrs. Mitchell and Berkeley, Solicitors, 27, Lincolns-inn-fields ; the King’s Head, Mitcham; Cock Inn, Sutton; principal Inns at Tooting, Merton, and Epsom; the Greyhound, Croydon ; and of Messrs. Crawter, Surveyors, Land Agents, &c., 5, Bedford-row (W.C.), and Cobham, Surrey.

Source: Sussex Agricultural Express – Tuesday 15 March 1859 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Chart Close

Named after the Chart family for their long association with Mitcham.

Photo taken December 2005

Photo taken December 2005

From the Mitcham Cricket Green Conservation Area and Appraisal Plan July 2013 (pdf):

A short terrace of late 20th Century cottages on the site of a former tennis court formerly within the garden of 21 Cricket Green. Two-stories and built of rendered blockwork these are of pastiche Victorian styling with traditional style sash windows and projecting canopies over the entrances.

1953 OS Map

1953 OS Map showing tennis courts behind no. 21

2015 map

2015 map

aerial view

aerial view from Bing Maps

1927 The Last Vestry Clerk

MITCHAM VESTRY CLERK.
INTERESTING SURREY RECORD.

Mr. R. M. Chart, of Mitcham, deputy chairman of the Croydon County Bench, has notified the Mitcham Council that on March 31st he will cease to be the vestry clerk for Mitcham, a post which he has held for 39 years all but three days, and which has been held by his direct ancestors for 166 years without a break. Mr. Chart is the last of the Mitcham vestry clerks, the office being abolished under the new Rating and Valuation Act, but the duties will be carried on by his son, Colonel Stephen Chart, who is clerk to the Mitcham Council.

The first vestry clerk for Mitcham was Mr. R. M. Chart’s great-grandfather, who was appointed in 1761 at a salary of £3 a year, and held the post for 44 years. His grandfather, who built the present Mitcham parish church, held it for 41 years, and his father held it for 42 years. All these men held the post until they died, and were parish clerks as well. Mr. R. M. Chart, who is 76 years old, still does the work of more than 12 public appointments, and takes an active interest in most local affairs. He was a member of the Surrey County Council for 25 years, for nine years as alderman.

Source: Surrey Mirror – Friday 04 March 1927 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1875 Easter Vestry Meeting

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 03 April 1875

MITCHAM.
Easter Vestry Meeting.

The annual Easter Vestry was held in the Vestry Room on Tuesday evening. The Rev. D. F. Wilson, vicar of the parish, occupied the chair, and among others present were E. Mills and J. Bridger, Esqrs. (churchwardens), F. Gale, Esq., Messrs W. Blakeney, W. R. Harwood, J. Harwood, J. Summerfield, J. Paxton, T. Batchelor, W. Smith, C. B. Hallward, &c. Messrs. E. Mills and J. Bridger having declined to serve churchwardens again this year, the vicar nominated as his churchwarden C. B. Hallward, Esq. On the motion of Mr. Bridger, seconded by Mr. Mills, Jermain Nobes, Esq., was elected parish churchwarden. The Overseers were re-elected, being Messrs W. R. Harwood, Abrehart, and S. Love. The waywardens, Messrs. T. Allen, T. Bachelor, and H. Newman were also re-elected. After some discussion as to whether it was requisite to continue the office of assistant-overseer, it was resolved that Mr. R. M. Chart should be appointed at salary of £25. The auditors for the Lighting Rate Accounts and the Endowed Charities Accounts were re-elected, being Messrs. W. Smith, W. Field, and J. Harwood. Mr. W. Hills, jun., having been re-elected Inspector of places for slaughtering horses, the Vicar presented the Charity Accounts, and the proceedings were brought to a close a vote of thanks to the Chairman.