Tag Archives: 1961

234 to 240 London Road

On the west side of London Road, this is currently a 1960s three storey building that replaced a row of shops that had formed part of the old High Street.

Clip from Merton Memories photo 27990, copyright London Borough of Merton

1952 OS map

This clip from a Merton Memories photo was taken in 1961, and shows the board announcing that numbers 234 to 240 are to be replaced by a new building.

Clip from Merton Memories photo 51738, copyright London Borough of Merton.

If you click on this clip to see the full photo on the Merton Memories website, you can see the businesses (from left to right) as:

240, C.F. HARDY, hairdressers
238, MONARCH, dyers and cleaners
236, KWIK KNIT CENTRE
234, GROVEPERT Ltd.

Numbers 12, 13, 14 and 15 were renumbered, (in 1926/7), to 240, 238, 236 and 234.

Occupants from street directories:
1891
12, Charles MACRO, hair dresser
13, C. SAUNDERS & Co., grocers
14, William COURT, baker
15, MOULAND & BENNETT, Watchmakers

1925
12, H. MACRO, hair dresser
13, Miss H.M. HICKS, milliner
14, M. HICKS & Sons, bakers
15, G.H. HUDSON, watch maker

1930
240, William J. KEMP, hair dresser
238, Miss Hilda Mary HICKS, milliner
236, M. HICKS & Sons, confectioners
234, Mrs. George Henry HUDSON, watch maker

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Post Office in Langdale Parade

7 and 8 Langdale Parade, Upper Green East, Mitcham CR4 2YS

The premises for the post office were obtained in 1958, although it didn’t open until 1961, as explained in the news article below.

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1961, page 1.

GPO explain post office mystery

THE G.P.O. explained this week the mystery Of Mitcham’s Langdale Parade post office—taken over in September, 1958, but still not open for business.

They blame the delay on capital expenditure restrictions. And they promise that “open” notices should go up at the end of this year.

It took Mitcham’s M.P. (Mr. Robert Carr) to solve the mystery. After reading about the unopened post office in the News on December 9 he wrote to the G.P.O. for an explanation.

Part of the reply was: “You probably know that the present Mitcham Post Office, sorting office and telephone exchange are housed in a building in London Road.

INADEQUATE

“The accommodation on the ground floor is inadequate for our postal needs and, unfortunately, site limitations prevent us from effecting improvements unless we remove some of the work done there at present.

“In May, 1957, we were offered accommodation in a new block of shops to be erected by a private firm of developers in Langdale Parade. We saw an opportunity of overcoming our difficulties by transferring the Post Office counter to the premises on offer.

“We knew at the time that owing to restrictions on capital expenditure, there was no immediate prospect of opening a post office on the Langdale Parade premises, but if we declined the offer we foresaw difficulty in acquiring suitable premises later.

” We therefore decided to accept, and the premises were leased for a term of 21 years from September, 1958, at the annual rental of £1,170 reduced to £400 per annum for the first three years or until the post office is opened for business, whichever is the earlier.”

Cost of the new post office — about £12,550. Fitting out should begin in March.

A photo from 1960 is on Merton Memories of the inside of the post office.

The land on which the parade of shops called Langdale Parade were built was bought in 1957 by Secunda Properties (Mitcham) Ltd from the Trustees of the Methodist Church at Mitcham. The church had been destroyed by bombing in the Second World War and was not rebuilt. This map from 1933 shows it occupied the site now known as Langdale Parade, with its car park at the back.

1933 OS map

1958 clip from Merton Memories photo 51620 of Langdale Parade after construction. Copyright London Borough of Merton.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1961 : Eldest of 3 brothers at TW Palmer retires

THE unique service of three brothers to one firm has come to an end—with the retirement of 75-year-old Charlie Sears from T. W. Palmer, constructional engineers, Merton Abbey.

Charlie, senior erection supervisor, joined the firm 61 years ago. But able to keep him in touch with latest developments will be his two brothers who have no thought of retiring yet.

Brother Bill (aged 70), Park Road, Colliers Wood, and brother Frank (aged 72), Wilson Avenue, joined T. W. Palmer soon after Charlie.

Source : Mitcham News & Mercury, 27th January, 1961, page 9.

In the 1901 census, Charles Sears, aged 15, is living with his parents James, 41, and Elizabeth Sears, 42, at no. 3 Blue Houses, Christchurch; with his brothers, Francis, 12, William, 10 and sisters Mary, 4 and Annie 1.

In the 1911 census, he is 25 and living with his wife Clara, also 25, and their son of 2 months Edmund at 7 Stamford Terrace, Feltham Road. His occupation is listed as an Iron Worker in an Iron Foundry.

1961 : Publicans welcome new betting laws

Publicans welcome the new laws

MITCHAM publicans welcome the new betting and gaming laws allowing small bets to be placed on bar games.

But some point out that it merely makes legal something that OH been going on for years.

Licensee of the Red Lion, Colliers Wood, Mr. Frank Clements, said this week: “I am all for it. We will now be able to organise whist drives and housey-housey for money.

“What I do think is ridiculous is that you can’t place a bet on a horse in the bar. To do that you have to go outside.”

Licensee of the Beehive, Commonside East, Mitcham, Mr. A. Pays, said it would clear up a lot of underhand practices.

Mr. William Lewis of the White Hart thinks it will make little difference to his customers. “What I am against,” he said “are the one arm bandits (slot machines).”

source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1961, page 1.

Edward Pullen gets MBE in 1961 but missed DCM in 1916

Local man in the Honours’ List

A MITCHAM First World War hero was made an M.B.E. in the New Year Honours. He is 64-year-old Mr. Edward Charles Pullen, Framfield Road, who will be given the award by the Queen.

He gets it for public service in the Inland Revenue Department — he is a staff officer at Somerset House.

His meeting with the Queen will make up for a disappointment he had in 1916 when he should have received the D.C.M. from King George the Fifth. When the investiture date arrived Mr. Pullen had influenza.

Mr. Pullen said this week: “This rather goes to make up for it”

WOUNDED

He earned the D.C.M. during the Battle of the Somme while serving with the Northamptonshire Regiment. His company was trying to win a German strongpoint at Thiepval.

All the officers were wounded or killed and Mr. Pullen, then a sergeant, took charge. Although himself seriously wounded, he led his men to capture the outpost and held it until they were relieved next day.

Between 1919 and 1929 he played for the Wanderers, forerunners of Tooting and Mitcham United.

Mr. Pullen retires in April when he reaches 65.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1961

His MBE award was published in the London Gazette on 27 December 1960 in supplement 42231, page 8906.

His DCM award was reported in the London Gazette of 24 November 1916 in supplement 29837, page 11559.

13537 E. C. Pullen, North’n R.

For conspicuous gallantry in action.

He assumed command of and led his company with great courage and initiative, capturing an enemy strong point. He was severely wounded.

Harry Frederick Winbow

Mr Harry Frederick Winbow, who knew Mitcham Common when cows grazed on it, died last week the age of 89.

Mr Winbow, Commonide East, Mitcham, is the father of Mr Henry Winbow, chairman of Mitcham Common Preservation Society.

He came to Mitcham in 1900 and bought a house in the Gorringe Park estate , then being developed. In those days the house was surrounded by corn fields

Most of his life he was a maintenance engineer at the Bachelors’ Club in the West End.

Before he retired at the age of 70, he ran the Dorset Inn at Withyham, Sussex, for five years. During the First World War he served in the Royal Flying Corps.

Mr Henry Winbow said this week: “Many people knew him in Mitcham, especially the traders at Fair Green. He used to do the shopping for us.”

He leaves a widow, Agnes Louise (aged 92), two sons, Henry and Arthur, and a daughter, Maud.

Source: Mitcham News and Mercury, 13th January, 1961.


Harry Frederick Winbow in the 1911 England Census
Name: Harry Frederick Winbow
Age in 1911: 39
Estimated birth year: abt 1872
Relation to Head: Head
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Westminster, London, England
Civil Parish: Mitcham
County/Island: Surrey
Country: England
Street address: Kendrick, Commonside East, Mitcham, Surrey
Marital Status: Married
Occupation: Electrical Engineer In Club
Registration district: Croydon
Registration District Number: 39
Sub-registration district: Mitcham
ED, institution, or vessel: 14
Household schedule number: 33
Piece: 3434

Household Members:
Name Age
Harry Frederick Winbow 39
Agnes Louise Winbow 41
Henry Francis George Winbow 16
Constance Elizabeth Winbow 15
Maud Mary Louise Winbow 13
Arthur Stanley Buckler Winbow 3
William Holmes 84
Dorothy Beatrice Holmes 19

Source Citation
Class: RG14; Piece: 3434; Schedule Number: 33
Source Information
Ancestry.com. 1911 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911.