Tag Archives: 1933

Grove Lodge Garage

Grove Lodge Garage was described in a news item on page 1 of the 24th February, 1933, Mitcham News & Mercury, as being at Tramway Path, near Mitcham Station, and kept by Frank GUYATT, builder and contractor.

BIG BLAZE AT A GARAGE
Fighting the Flames in the Snow
Factory Saved

Considerable damage was done by a fire which broke out shortly before six o’clock on Saturday morning at Grove Lodge Garage.

The discovery was made by Mr George Potter, of London Road, who informed the police, and they summoned the Mitcham Fire Brigade..

Chief Officer Albert O. Wells promptly turned out with one engine and a complement of men. The other engine, also fully manned, followed shortly afterwards. There was a blizzard of snow at the time, and the firemen experienced great inconvenience. They found a large corrugated iron building ablaze from end to end. Plenty of hose and a good supply of water enabled the firemen successfully to cope with the outbreak and keep it from spreading. The direction of the wind helped them.

The Damage

The garage was burnt out, two motor cars and a miscellany of goods, machinery, etc. being destroyed, running into several hundreds of pounds. The fire attacked a neighbouring factory, but this was saved, though police and willing helpers salvaged a valuable quantity of chemical food stored therein to make sure the fire did not affect it.

The firemen were handicapped by many tons of burning rubber refuse in the buildings, which caused dense fumes. Several tons of copies of the Talmud (Jewish books of law), which were unfolded and unbound, caught fire and were destroyed.

At one time the blaze was so terrific that it was actually seen by a milkman in Carshalton Road, two miles away.

Nobody was hurt, and the firemen left after several hours’ hard work, during which they had the satisfaction of saving some very valuable property.

The chemical food referred to may have been Lactagol.

1933 Explosion – Slightly Injured List

From the Norwood News – Friday 31 March 1933, via the British Newspaper Archive

SLIGHTLY INJURED.

10 Belgrave Road
Mrs. MARY WALLS (aged 57)

12 Belgrave Road
Miss MAUD SEALEY (aged 17)
ELIZABETH SEALEY (aged 12)
PEGGY SEALEY (aged 10)

13 Belgrave Road
HENRY SEALEY (aged 29)

16 Belgrave Road
MYRTLE CONNOR (aged 15)

18 Belgrave Road
FREDERICK WELLER (aged 18)

20 Belgrave Road
Mrs CISSIE SPARROWHAWK (aged 42)

24 Belgrave Road
Mrs. MINNIE JARDINE (aged 40)
ALEC JARDINE (aged 17)

28 Belgrave Road
CHARLES WHITING (aged 30)
Mrs. MINNIE E. WHITING (aged 30)
ELIZABETH WHITING (aged 12)

30 Belgrave Road
Mrs. ETHEL GOODSELL (aged 48).

34 Belgrave Road
JOHN FOSTER (aged 48)

27 Queen’s Road
Miss ELLEN COOPER (aged 18)
ANNIE COLLINS (aged 18)

6, Stanley-road, Morden

FRANK CAPLIN (aged 28)
All these are suffering from bruises and cuts on head, body, and legs (not of a serious nature), caused by falling debris.

The Official Report on the Explosion also has names and addresses of those affected, with details of buildings damaged.

Mitcham Park

Mitcham Park is a road that runs from off the south side of Cricket Green by the Mitcham Police station, and connects to the east side of the London Road, north of the former Mitcham railway station.

As of 2018, Royal Mail lists four postcodes for this road:

CR4 4EN : odd numbers 1 to 31
CR4 4EG : even numbers 2 to 32 and East Lodge
CR4 4EP : odd numbers 29 to 59
CR4 4EJ : even numbers 34 to 106.

The block of flats on the corner with London Road, was built on the site of 389, 391 and 393 London Road in 2005/6. The block consist of 28 flats, and it was given the address of 59 Mitcham Park. See planning permission 04/P2012.

1953 OS map

Other OS maps below show the development of the road.
1894
1910
1933

An auction in 1902 describes the two semi-detached houses on the west side of Mitcham park: from the South London Press – Saturday 09 August 1902, via the British Newspaper Archives.

Close to Mitcham Common – TWO PAIRS of semi-detached ViLLAS, known as Nos. 1, 3, 5, and 7, Mitcham Park. Each house contains five bed rooms, two reception rooms, kitchen, and usual offices. No. 1 let at £60 per annum. Nos. 5 and 7 let at £55 per annum each. No. 9 will be sold with the advantage of vacant possession, but of the estimated rental value of £60 per annum, at which rental it now Iet. Lease about 90 years; ground rent £8 each.

Douglas Young & co. will sell the above by AUCTION, at the Mart, E.C., on Wednesday, September 10, 1902, at 2 o’clock precisely. Particulars and conditions of sale may be obtained at the Mart. E.C : of the Solicitors, Messrs. GEDGE, KIRBY, & MILLETT. 11, Great George-street. Westminster: or of the Auctioneers, 51, Coleman-street. K.C., and 213, Clapham-road. S.W.

These aerial photos of the houses show their single, high pitch roof which differs from the other houses that have double-pitched roofs.

Semis 1 & 3, and 5 & 7, Mitcham Park

West side of Mitcham park, from number 1 at the top to number 19 and the bottom

Occupants

1904
West Side
1, Miss COLES
5, John Marsh PITT
7, George BRIDGE
15, Rev. John EDGELL
19, William W. THOMSON
33, Hugh Knight
37, Reginald Pocock BARROW
39, Charles OGDEN
43, Evans FAWCUS
47, Joseph BEARDMORE
53, James W. BOWDING
55, Col. Ernest GRATTAN

East Side

East Lodge, James JOHNSON
2, Felix Andre Jules MOYSE
6, Francis Ringler THOMSON
10, P.A. LEON
12, Mrs HARVIE
14, A.I. SUCKLING-BARON
16, Arthur Ernest ANWYL
22, Miss ANDERSON
26, Arthur Henry BALFOUR
28, Alfred MILLER
32, Wilson ALDWINCKLE

Note that all of these houses, from 15 to 55, and 2 to 32, are of the same design, namely double-pitched roofs with square-U layout to rear.

1953 OS map

This map of 1894 shows the land around Mitcham Hall where Mitcham Park was built, up to Jeppos Lane.

1894 OS map

The land was auctioned in the same year, as listed in the Willesden Chronicle – Saturday 12 May 1894, via the British Newspaper Archive.

In a marquee on the Estate, on MONDAY, June 1, 40 Plots, first portion of the Mitcham Park Estate, adjoining the railway station, and in the centre of the town, fronting on the main road from London to Epsom.

Also, in one lot, the Freehold family Mansion, known as Mitcham Hall, with its beautifully-timbered pleasure grounds and gardens of five acres, and two excellent semi-detached villas.

Vender’s Solicitors. Messrs. Gedge, Kirby, and Millett, 1, Old Palace-yard, S.W.; Architect and Surveyor, W. Mac Thompson, Esq., Holly – cottage, Mitcham

This 1910 map shows the square U-shaped houses that were built:

1910 OS map

The 1933 map shows further development of smaller houses along the south side of the road, and between the gaps on the north / west side.

1933 OS map

News Articles

From the Western Daily Press – Friday 16 August 1935:

The birth of a son at Mitcham Park, Mitcham, to Mrs Winifred Freeman — Miss Polly Ward, the revue actress and dancer is announced.

Mrs Freeman is the only daughter of Miss Winifred Ward, the principal boy, and granddaughter of the late Will Poluski, the Victorian comedian. She was married in 1928 to Mr Robert Sydney Freeman, ” the hero of her schooldays.”

Advert from Norwood News – Friday 20 February 1953

WANTED. Teacher, preparatory school for boys and girls. 6 to 7 1/2

Clarendon Preparatory School, 17 Mitcham Park, Mitcham. Tel. Mitcham. 1444

The widow of the Reverend Lipshytz lived at number 6.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1933 : Husband and wife buried in one grave

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1933, page 2

IN DEATH THEY WERE NOT DIVIDED

Husband and Wife Buried in One Grave

“In death not divided” is a truism in regard to Mr. Thomas Cornelius Ware
and his wife, Mrs. Annie Jane Ware, of ” St. Olave’s.” Ashbourne-road, Mltcham.

Within four hours after his wife had been brought home dead from a London
hospital, Mr. Ware passed away. He practically foretold his death, for he
remarked to the members of his family after he had made up his accounts on
Saturday, “I shall go when mother comes home.” Mrs. Ware had died on December 29, and Mr. Ware on December 31.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Ware were 70 years old, and highly reepected in Mitcham,
where they had lived a great number of years. Mr. Ware was a retired compositor, having worked 27 years for Odham’s Press, Ltd., London.

Mrs. Ware was an active worker on behalf of the Mitcham and Tooting
Floral and Horticultural Society, and a member of the committee. She also
took a great interest in the St. Barnabas’ Church Mothers’ Union, being a Sunday-school teacher and a member of the Parochial Council.

Mr. Ware made gardening his hobby. In three years’ time Mr. and Mrs. Ware
would have celebrated their golden wedding. They formerly resided in Longley-road. Tooting.

One daughter, Miss M. A. Ware, head-mistress of the junior mixed department, Singlegate School, and four sons, all married, mourn the loss of devoted parents.

THE FUNERAL

The funeral was a double one, both Mr. and Mrs. Ware being buried in the
same grave in the new Mitcham Cemetery, London-road, on Wednesday after-
noon. The burial was preceded by a service in St. Barnabas’ Church. conducted by the Vicar. the Rev. E. J. Baker, assisted by the Rev. E. M. Vanston. The service was fully choral, with Mr. J. H. Humphries (a former organist of St. Barnabas’) at the organ. The music included Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony, Mendelssohn’s Funeral March, and two favourite hymns, ” Jesu, Lover of my soul.” and “Allelulia, Sing to Jesus.”

A large number of relatives and friends followed to the burial ground to witness the remains laid to rest.

FLORAL TRIBUTES.

The floral tributes were many and beautiful, and included those from:

… companions at Odham’s Press; St. Barnabas’ Mothers’ Union; St. Barnabas’ Working Party; North Mitcham Improvement Association; staff of Singlegate Junior Schools; friends at Gorringe Park School; Messrs. H.C.F. and F. Weber; employees of Messrs. J.F. Renshaw & Co., Ltd.; … Mr E.J. and Mr and Mrs E.E. Mizen; Mr A. Mizen and the Misses Mizen; Miss Alice Mizen; …

The Driftway

Road off east side of Streatham Road, north of Sandy Lane, built in 1933/34. From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council, volume 17, page 574:

Road leading to Mitcham Wanderers Football Ground. Read letter from My. E. J. Peacock stating that he thought the question of the name of this road should be left to the Highways Committee of the Council. Resolved, That this road be named “The Driftway”.

1952 OS map

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1933 : Second boxing exhibition

Mitcham News & Mercury, 10th February, 1933, page 2.

MORE BOXING AT MITCHAM

Large Attendance at the Baths

EVENING OF GOOD SPORT

…. (preamble omitted) …

The opening contest of the evening was between Boy BINKS, of Streatham, and Sammy SMITH, of Mitcham, over six rounds. It was a hard-hitting match, with both men swinging wildly at each other. The first three mrounds went in favour of Binks, who was more aggressive than Smith. However, the tide turned in favour of Smith during the remaining rounds; he had his man down for a count of eight from a stinging right when the bell stopped the fifth round. The sixth round found Smith attacking most. The referee’s decision was a draw.

Scheduled for eight rounds, the next bout lasted for two. Danny GARDINER, of westbourne Park, outboxed his opponent, Jack DAY, of Kingston. Day went to the boards for a count in the first round, but he fought back strongly, to send his man down for a count, the bell saving him.

In the second round Day was knocked off his feet on two occasions, and the referee intervened in favour of Gardiner, Day sustaining a cut eye.

The next bout was a comic event, Albert LLOYD, of Mitcham, drew with Bill HUNTLEY, of Tooting, over six rounds. Both men evoked much laughter from the spectators by their funny tactics, and when they started a fight of their own between the rounds cheers greeted their efforts. Each man in turn went down for a count, and it seemed quite possible that the fight would end with both men on the boards, but it actually finished with both men still wanting to fight on.

A GOOD MATCH

The big event of the evening was between Kid SOCKS, of Bethnal Green, and Sandy McEWAN, of Glasgow. The fight lasted for the full fifteen rounds, and Socks gave an almost perfect exhibition of how to use the left hand. McEwan, on the other hand, was a hard-punching, two-handed fighter.

For the majority of the bout the fighters were well-matched, McEwan striving hard to batter the elusive Socks. In the end it was a case of those pitiless left leads leaving their mark, and the fourteenth round found McEwan weakening, the last two rounds going definitely in Socks’ favour.

The referee awarded the match to Socks on points, but it was a very close fight.

Harry TAYLOR, of Tooting, was unlucky to be knocked out by Bill LEE, of St. James’s, in the second round of their six-round bout, for with his hard swinging rights and lefts he had his man groggy in the first round. His carelessness in the second led to his undoing, for, leavung himself unguarded while he sought to put his man out, he himself caught a right on the jaw, which finished the bout.

The last fight of the evening, over six rounds, between Jack ROBERTS, of wimbledon, and Tom RADFORD, of Tooting, was a battle royal of hectic youth, Both boys flung discretion to the winds and fought in an alarmingly wild manner. Radford was down for a count of eight in the second round, and the bell saved him from the full count at the end of the third round, when a rather low swing from Roberts caused him considerable distress. In the fifth round Radford took the full count and Roberts was awarded the fight.

The evening was ably conducted by Mr. Harry Brevett, late M.C. at the N.S.C., Albert Hall and Olympia, while Johnny Curley as the referee acquitted himself in a praiseworthy manner. The timekeeper was Mr. Hunter, and seconds Arthur Goodwin and Archie Watson.

1933 : Fire Brigades are not compulsory

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 10th February, 1933.

FIRE BRIGADES ARE NOT COMPULSORY
REVELATION BY CHIEF OFFICER WELLS

Mr. Albert O. Wells, chief officer of Mitcham Fire Brigade, speaking at a meeting of Reigate firemen on Saturday, said the fire brigade law of this country needed altering.

At the moment, he said, it was not compulsory for a local authority to maintain a fire brigade, and the protection of life and property became the responsibility of a minority largely helped by a system of voluntary service.

There were piles upon piles of properties in this country unprotected from risk of fire in any way.

Mr. Wells also gave details of an experiment now going an in Surrey for a County Fire Board, organised in four divisions to account for every square inch of the County.

Mr. Wells hoped Surrey would go down in history as the pioneer in adopting a system that would eventually become general throughout the country.