Tag Archives: 1933

1933 : Husband and wife buried in one grave

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1933, page 2


Husband and Wife Buried in One Grave

“In death not divided” is a truism in regard to Mr. Thomas Cornelius Ware
and his wife, Mrs. Annie Jane Ware, of ” St. Olave’s.” Ashbourne-road, Mltcham.

Within four hours after his wife had been brought home dead from a London
hospital, Mr. Ware passed away. He practically foretold his death, for he
remarked to the members of his family after he had made up his accounts on
Saturday, “I shall go when mother comes home.” Mrs. Ware had died on December 29, and Mr. Ware on December 31.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Ware were 70 years old, and highly reepected in Mitcham,
where they had lived a great number of years. Mr. Ware was a retired compositor, having worked 27 years for Odham’s Press, Ltd., London.

Mrs. Ware was an active worker on behalf of the Mitcham and Tooting
Floral and Horticultural Society, and a member of the committee. She also
took a great interest in the St. Barnabas’ Church Mothers’ Union, being a Sunday-school teacher and a member of the Parochial Council.

Mr. Ware made gardening his hobby. In three years’ time Mr. and Mrs. Ware
would have celebrated their golden wedding. They formerly resided in Longley-road. Tooting.

One daughter, Miss M. A. Ware, head-mistress of the junior mixed department, Singlegate School, and four sons, all married, mourn the loss of devoted parents.


The funeral was a double one, both Mr. and Mrs. Ware being buried in the
same grave in the new Mitcham Cemetery, London-road, on Wednesday after-
noon. The burial was preceded by a service in St. Barnabas’ Church. conducted by the Vicar. the Rev. E. J. Baker, assisted by the Rev. E. M. Vanston. The service was fully choral, with Mr. J. H. Humphries (a former organist of St. Barnabas’) at the organ. The music included Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony, Mendelssohn’s Funeral March, and two favourite hymns, ” Jesu, Lover of my soul.” and “Allelulia, Sing to Jesus.”

A large number of relatives and friends followed to the burial ground to witness the remains laid to rest.


The floral tributes were many and beautiful, and included those from:

… companions at Odham’s Press; St. Barnabas’ Mothers’ Union; St. Barnabas’ Working Party; North Mitcham Improvement Association; staff of Singlegate Junior Schools; friends at Gorringe Park School; Messrs. H.C.F. and F. Weber; employees of Messrs. J.F. Renshaw & Co., Ltd.; … Mr E.J. and Mr and Mrs E.E. Mizen; Mr A. Mizen and the Misses Mizen; Miss Alice Mizen; …


The Driftway

Road off east side of Streatham Road, north of Sandy Lane, built in 1933/34. From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council, volume 17, page 574:

Road leading to Mitcham Wanderers Football Ground. Read letter from My. E. J. Peacock stating that he thought the question of the name of this road should be left to the Highways Committee of the Council. Resolved, That this road be named “The Driftway”.

1952 OS map

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

1933 : Second boxing exhibition

Mitcham News & Mercury, 10th February, 1933, page 2.


Large Attendance at the Baths


…. (preamble omitted) …

The opening contest of the evening was between Boy BINKS, of Streatham, and Sammy SMITH, of Mitcham, over six rounds. It was a hard-hitting match, with both men swinging wildly at each other. The first three mrounds went in favour of Binks, who was more aggressive than Smith. However, the tide turned in favour of Smith during the remaining rounds; he had his man down for a count of eight from a stinging right when the bell stopped the fifth round. The sixth round found Smith attacking most. The referee’s decision was a draw.

Scheduled for eight rounds, the next bout lasted for two. Danny GARDINER, of westbourne Park, outboxed his opponent, Jack DAY, of Kingston. Day went to the boards for a count in the first round, but he fought back strongly, to send his man down for a count, the bell saving him.

In the second round Day was knocked off his feet on two occasions, and the referee intervened in favour of Gardiner, Day sustaining a cut eye.

The next bout was a comic event, Albert LLOYD, of Mitcham, drew with Bill HUNTLEY, of Tooting, over six rounds. Both men evoked much laughter from the spectators by their funny tactics, and when they started a fight of their own between the rounds cheers greeted their efforts. Each man in turn went down for a count, and it seemed quite possible that the fight would end with both men on the boards, but it actually finished with both men still wanting to fight on.


The big event of the evening was between Kid SOCKS, of Bethnal Green, and Sandy McEWAN, of Glasgow. The fight lasted for the full fifteen rounds, and Socks gave an almost perfect exhibition of how to use the left hand. McEwan, on the other hand, was a hard-punching, two-handed fighter.

For the majority of the bout the fighters were well-matched, McEwan striving hard to batter the elusive Socks. In the end it was a case of those pitiless left leads leaving their mark, and the fourteenth round found McEwan weakening, the last two rounds going definitely in Socks’ favour.

The referee awarded the match to Socks on points, but it was a very close fight.

Harry TAYLOR, of Tooting, was unlucky to be knocked out by Bill LEE, of St. James’s, in the second round of their six-round bout, for with his hard swinging rights and lefts he had his man groggy in the first round. His carelessness in the second led to his undoing, for, leavung himself unguarded while he sought to put his man out, he himself caught a right on the jaw, which finished the bout.

The last fight of the evening, over six rounds, between Jack ROBERTS, of wimbledon, and Tom RADFORD, of Tooting, was a battle royal of hectic youth, Both boys flung discretion to the winds and fought in an alarmingly wild manner. Radford was down for a count of eight in the second round, and the bell saved him from the full count at the end of the third round, when a rather low swing from Roberts caused him considerable distress. In the fifth round Radford took the full count and Roberts was awarded the fight.

The evening was ably conducted by Mr. Harry Brevett, late M.C. at the N.S.C., Albert Hall and Olympia, while Johnny Curley as the referee acquitted himself in a praiseworthy manner. The timekeeper was Mr. Hunter, and seconds Arthur Goodwin and Archie Watson.

1933 : Fire Brigades are not compulsory

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 10th February, 1933.


Mr. Albert O. Wells, chief officer of Mitcham Fire Brigade, speaking at a meeting of Reigate firemen on Saturday, said the fire brigade law of this country needed altering.

At the moment, he said, it was not compulsory for a local authority to maintain a fire brigade, and the protection of life and property became the responsibility of a minority largely helped by a system of voluntary service.

There were piles upon piles of properties in this country unprotected from risk of fire in any way.

Mr. Wells also gave details of an experiment now going an in Surrey for a County Fire Board, organised in four divisions to account for every square inch of the County.

Mr. Wells hoped Surrey would go down in history as the pioneer in adopting a system that would eventually become general throughout the country.

1933 : First boxing show at the Baths Hall

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 3rd February, 1933, page 1


Exhibition Contests at the New Baths

A large number of Mitcham Councillors witnessed the first boxing exhibition to be held at the new Mitcham Baths, which took place on Monday evening. Before the boxing began the public who were present were told that they had the matter in their own hands as to whether regular boxing shows should be given at the baths or not, and the general verdict of the councillors was that the crowd had behaved splendidly.

“No complaints” was the general verdict of the Mitcham councillors after they had witnessed the first public boxing exhibition in the new Baths Hall on Monday evening.

The hall had been let to Mr. Meltonville for a boxing entertainment on the understanding that if a satisfactory report after the first occasion was received, the baths superintendent should be authorised to accept bookings from Mr. Meltonville every Monday during February.

The promoter, anxious to convince the Council of his integrity and the orderliness of his entertainment, invited the whole of the members of the Council to witness the exhibition for themselves. Most of the councillors availed themselves of the privilege, and there were present during the evening Couns. S. L. Gaston, J.P. (chairman of the Baths Committee), E. J. D. Field, H. F. Cusden, W. Dalton, J. S. Abraham, A. E. D. Clark, W. Curtis Wakeford, H. H. Dance, S. W. Duckett, T. A. East, S. J. Humphries, L. F. Rolls, S. R. Self, W. J. Blandford, G. W. Cole, J. Brewer, R. A. Brodie and Mr. Riley Schofield (surveyor and engineer).

Ring-side tickets were presented to the councillors, but the majority preferred not to be too prominent, and they sat on the platform at the far end of the hall.


Over a thousand spectators were present, and they behaved splendidly, very little partisanship being evinced during any of the contests. There was a fair sprinkling of the fair sex.

At the outset, the announcer appealed to the assembly to give fair play to the boxers and to behave like respectable citizens. “If you do that,” he added, “the promoter will give you full value for your money, and a square deal in the way of tip-top boxers, and probably a few champions, and you will be able to have these exhibitions regularly. If you do not behave properly then it will mean shutting down.” The crowd cheered in agreement.

Six bouts were successfully carried through without the slightest hitch so far as the spectators were concerned. One or two substitutes had to be found for advertised boxers who failed to turn up. Otherwise the programme was observed to the letter, with capable officials on duty and a perfect ring.

Before the last contest started, Mr. J. Windsor stepped into the ring, and speaking on behalf of Mr. Meltonville and himself, said he must thank the assembly for the way in which they had behaved throughout the show. He hoped that in future shows they would conduct themselves in the same orderly fashion. “It remains in your hands,” Mr. Windsor added, “whether these shows are held. If you behave properly they will continue, and you will see some of the best boxing talent in the country. I want to pay tribute to the Mitcham Council. I have never come across a more beautiful hall than this baths hall. It is a credit to the Council and the ratepayers, and I trust you will do your best in keeping it nice and respectable.” (Loud cheers).


Coun. S. L. Gaston, J.P., chairman of the Baths Committee, said: “I have no complaints whatever. The conduct of the spectators has been quite good. Personally, I have seen nothing whatever to take exception to, and as far as I can see, the shows will be permitted to go on. If the crowd always behaves in the same orderly manner nothing can be said against them. They were as good as gold to-night, and I hope they will always be the same. For a first attempt the exhibition was satisfactory in every way.”

Coun. Harry Cusden said: “You could have not got a better audience in the Central Hall, Tooting Broadway, at a Brotherhood meeting. I have seen many scraps at the Ring and the National Sporting Club, but never have I sat with a more orderly lot of chaps. I got among the mob because I wanted to see the scrapping, and I must say I neither saw nor heard anything to object to. Of course, there were some of “the lads of the village” present and their language would not appeal to everybody, but is is their ordinary vocabulary, and you have to put up with it. I heard several comment favourably on the hall; in fact, they appeared astounded, and I think they appreciated the nice surroundings, and were inclined to make their conduct fit in with them. In all my experience of boxing crowds, I am certain this was the best. They were a credit to themselves and everybody concerned. If they keep it up nobody can object to the assemblies and the shows.”

Coun. W. Dalton was rather reticent. He said: “I have seen nothing I can object to in the behaviour of the crowd.”

Coun. S. W. Duckett said: “I had an open mind when I came. I am leaving with the conviction that a boxing crowd can behave.”

Coun. Cole had previously asserted that if there was a demand for boxing displays in Mitcham the people had a right to say whether they wanted boxing or dancing in the hall. He sat with Coun. Cusden in the gallery watching the show, and expressed himself as perfectly satisfied.

Couns. Field and Brewer openly confessed that boxing displays did not appeal to them.

Mr. C. P. Walker, the baths superintendent, told one of our reporters next morning: “I don’t remember a more orderly boxing crowd. At Hull it was much different, but, of course, it is expected and the crowd don’t disappoint you. From my contact with the crowd here, I feel they were impressed by the appeal made to them from the ring at the start, and they realised that no nonsense would be tolerated. I think also that they do not want to jeopardise future shows. I heard scores of spectators say they had never seen a nicer hall, and it was a pity if anything was done to spoil it. I can say that no damage whatever was committed, and the refuse left behind was nothing to complain about. There were just two empty pint beer bottles and the usual refuse to be seen the morning afer any cinema show. Not a single chair was any the worse, though a few were used for standing on at the back. However, when the attendants spoke to the offenders they were quite reasonable and readily did as they were asked. I regard the crowd as quite normal, and personally, I have no complaint to make of any description.”

The boxing contests were quite exciting, though scarcely attaining the standard anticipated. Four bouts over twelve rounds figured on the programme, but only one of these travelled the full distance.

Eddie MANNING (Tooting) scored a popular victory over Harry JENKINS (Camden Town), who retired at the end of the eighth round with a badly damaged eye.

Patsy FLYNN (Blackfriars) did not experience much trouble in disposing of Alf. WATTS (Edmonton), who was knocked out in the second round.

Johnny HARRIS (King’s Cross) beat Herbie FRASER (Westbourne Park), the referee intervening at the end of the seventh round.

Jack ELLIS (Bermondsey) had to fight hard before outpointing Sonnie DOKE (Battersea). This was easily the best encounter of the evening, and as “the old un” stood up and exchanged blow for blow with his younger adversary, the crowd cheered vociferously, Doke visibly tired with his punishment, but he managed to keep going, and made a gallant toe-to-toe fight of it. At the finish the applause was equal and the liberal shower of coppers in the ring showed the bout had been well appreciated.

In a six-round bout, Sonny SMITH (Mitcham) beat “Young” BRUMMY (Blackfriars) on points, and Harry TAYLOR (Tooting) knocked out Jack ROBERTS (Wimbledon) in the fourth round of the concluding bout.

1933: Iolanthe performed by Mitcham County School

The Mitcham County School’s headmaster (1930 – 1952), Alan John DOIG, was an enthusiast for Gilbert & Sullivan, and his Iolanthe production was reported as a ‘remarkable show’ on the front page of the 27th January, 1933 issue of the Mitcham News & Mercury.

Remarkable Show by

The Lord Chancellor – J. P. MacLaren
Earl of Mountararat – A. L. Watts
Earl Tolloller – P. C. Didcock
Private Willis – J. H. Stainforth
Strephon – H. A. Packer
Queen of the Fairies – S. A. R. Rose
Iolanthe – R. Stainforth
Celia – D. Trench
Leila – W. E. Trench
Fleta – V. C. Clark
Phyllis – S. J. Ashby

Chorus of Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons: P. Adams, O. D. Brooks, R. Brown, K. S. Bulbeck, C. C. Creed, R. Cronk, R. C. Gifkins, T. A. Henry, D. A. Lucy. J. S. Seeley, J. Selby, B. Taylor, R. H Watts, E. W. Warner, S. Wilhelm, M. Wilkie, G. Winchester.

Chorus of Fairies: D. Andrews, J. A. Brett, K. F. Campbell, P. B. Chappie, J. H. Cliff, J. F. Courteney, D. P. Curran, C. Hale, Y. S. Hart, C. W. Hollowell, H. R. J?ffs, H. F. Johnson, P. F. Lockyer, L. A. Miller, E. G. Nichols, S.A. Rose, D. F. Mackay, E. W. Sanders, E. Y. Towner, R. O. West, A. White, E. T. Wilkie.

English peers and immortal fairies rubbed shoulders at Mitcham Baths on Friday and Saturday of last week, when the Mitcham County School for Boys presented “Iolanthe ” as their third annual Gilbert and Sullivan production.

Mr. A. J. Doig (heed master) showed great courage in the selection of such a difficult work, but he evidently knew the abilities of his pupils, especially in the chorus work. Twenty odd youngsters, obviously from the lower school, were transformed into flitting, silver-voiced fairies, who sang with that natural, clear tone which a female chorus can never do.


Obviously. for a young, all-male cast the opera presented difficulties, but from the vocal point of view it did not suffer owing to the absence of females. The singing was the greatest of all the features of the show, and a school able to produce a better standard of singing would be hard to find.

Mr. A. J. Doig once again shouldered the great responsibilities of producer, coach and musical director, and excelled himself in all three capacities. Evidence of his coaching was seen in the way in which the entire cast combined action with singing, not an easy thing for amateurs. Even with the large amount of talented human material available, the show must have been the result of tremendous effort and thought on Mr. Doig’s part. Whether the acting satisfied Mr. Doig or not, the large audiences assured him that they were more than delighted with the show.

Of the cast, perhaps J. P. MacLaren, as the Lord Chancellor, was the most Gilbertian. Possessing a pleasing voice, he sang and frolicked his way through a role which required constant action. He was warmly encored for his singing in the second act, and he seemed quite comfortable when fooling with Mountararat (A. L. Watts) and Tolloller (P. C. Didcock), the two noble suitors. Watts’s remarkably mellow voice was heard to advantage in the second act, and he and his partner, Didcock, worked in perfect harmony. Didcock also possesses a promising voice, and he combined well in the trio.

Iolanthe was played by R. Stainforth, and was the most difficult role in the cast. To look young and yet be the mother of a senior member of the school is no easy task for a boy of Stainforth’s age. The extent of his successful interpretation seemed to frighten him, and his small voice did not encourage him. A very creditable performance of an uncomfortable and very difficult part.


S. J. Ashby was charming as Phyllis, the shepherdess, and many of the audience thought that a girl was playing the part. Ashby gave a display worthy of sincere congratulation. Singing, acting and deportment were necessary for the part, and he sang delightfully, acted naturally and carried himself so daintily that a few females might be envious of such grace. What a pity that such a clear voice will perhaps before long give place to more manly tones.

H. A. Packer was a spirited Strephon, and got through those uncomfortable love scenes with Phyllis quite creditably. His duets with Ashby proved very popular. Private Willis (J. H. Stainforth) had little to do, but proved that he was quite capable of more deserving parts.

The chorus of dukes, earls, viscounts and barons lent colour to the settings, but their voices were hardly heavy enough to bring out the finer points of the chorus work. The fairies out-weighed them in strength, but lacked some of the finer points of acting.

S. A. R. Rose was rather apathetic as the Fairy Queen, but improved considerably towards the end. His difficulty was the problem of using his hands. After several attempts, he adopted the stance of a weight-lifter posing before camera. Nervousness seemed to be troubling him, but he acted more easily in the second act.

The admiration of the large audiences was for all those who interpreted female parts. An announcement in the programme said that the proceeds of the performances were for improvement in the school’s new playing field. The programme also contained an invitation to the public to see the school “Rugger” teams in action. To see Phyllis tackled by the Fairy queen would be good fun, and would show that operatic production is not the only winter pastime in the school curriculum.

Mr. A. J. Doig conducted the orchestra, which consisted of the following:

First violin – Mrs. D. Stickings, Mr. A. White, Mr. E. V. S. Ericson;
Second violin – Mr. L. A. Johnston, Mr. C. G. Reed, Mr. C. Jones;
Viola – Mr. R. W. E. Stickings,
Violoncello – Mr. John Podel;
Trombone – Mr R. A. Johnson, Mr Caldow;
Pianos – Mr F. C. Hambleton, Mr. L. W. Stephens.

For a history of the school, see the Old Mitchamians website.

1933 : Obituary of Mr W.T. Clark, a Pascall director

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1933



The death took place at Brixton on Friday, December 23, of Mr, W. Thomas Clark, a director of Messrs. Pascall, who was one of the best known and highly esteemed men in the confectionery business. For some months Mr. Clark had been in indifferent health, which a sea voyage did not improve. In November he was ordered into Guy’s Hospital, and a severe operation was performed. The trouble, however, was too deep-seated, and shortly after his return home to Brixton he died.

The funeral took place on Wednesday of last week, at West Norwood Cemetery and, in addition to the widow, the brother (Mr. H. E. Clark) and other relatives, was attended by Mr. Sydney Pascall (chairman of the Board), Mr L. H Pascall (managing director), Mr. Wilfrid H. Pascall, Mr. S. E. Perkins and Mr. A. P Jones (director of James Pascall, Ltd.), a number of the firm’s representatives, and a large number of managers and heads of departments and others, all working colleagues and personal friends of Mr. Clark, and by many prominent members of the confectionery trade, who, as customers of the firm, were also his friends. Altogether the attendance was a remarkable tribute to the esteem and affection in which Mr. W. Thomas Clark was held by all.


Mr. Clark’s career, writes a correspondent, was both notable and interesting. It is well over fifty years ago that the late Mr James Pascall (founder of the firm), as the result of an amusing little boyish escapade he had witnessed, took on young Clark as an office boy. A real worker always, the lad soon made himself genuinely useful, and, with the growth of the business, rose step by step until he became sales manager, and later was elected to a seat on the Board of Directors.

Mr. W. Thomas Clark was remarkable for several qualities. Particularly his knowledge of the trade was unique, his memory almost uncanny. He not only knew hundreds, even thousands of the firms customers, but he was familiar also with the special character of their respective businesses. It is doubtful whether any single man in the trade has been so widely known among both wholesalers and retailers; and he was also well known to all the leading manufacturers.
Not only do the entire staff of James Pascall sadly miss their old friend, but the whole industry has lost one who in his time has rendered it yeoman service.