Tag Archives: 1926

1952 : A Park in his Care

From the Mitcham Advertiser, 2nd October, 1952, page 5.

A familiar figure in Mitcham is Mr George Finch, for 26 years in the employ of the the council and now gardener and charge-hand at Tamworth Farm recreation ground.

His first job with the council – there was no separate parks department in those days – was “mowing Figges Marsh.” After that he became a driver and remained at that job until about three years ago.

He joined the council in 1926, a week after his discharge from the Army.

Mr Finch, who comes from an old Mitcham family, was born in Phipps Bridge Road. As a youth of 17, he ran away from home to join the Army, but at the recruiting centre he was told he was under age. A few days later he went back to the recruiting officer and told him he was 18.

“Haven’t you been here before?” he was asked. “Never,” replied Mr Finch. He was accepted and served until 1926.

Mr Finch, who is 50, joined the council’s service a week after his discharge from the Army. He lives in Sibthorp Road.

1926 : Lower Mitcham Schoolboys’ Novel Jazz Band at Christmas

THE DUSTMEN’S CART SYMPHONY.

Schoolboys’ Novel Jazz Band.

“The Bath Road Symphony,” a musical medley descriptive of life in one of the poorest quarters of Mitcham, London, was publicly performed for the first time by Lower Mitcham schoolboys, whose instruments were made up of things found in the dustmen’s carts.

The boys were dressed as dustmen, and the instruments were old saucepans, knives and forks, combs, biscuit tins, pieces of bamboo, curtain rods cut into the form whistles, glass jam jars, and a bass drum made out of galvanised iron bath.

For Christmas Gifts.

The youthful conductor beat time with soup ladle, and, it is said, really excellent music was produced from the extraordinary assortment of instruments. The medley was arranged by Mr H. C. Toller, one of the masters.

Mr F. C. Stone, the headmaster, arranged the concert to provide Christmas cheer for the 350 boys school, of whom, he said, had never received a Christmas present in their lives.

In addition to the symphony orchestra, there was a boys’ mouth organ band, which played popular songs like experts, and bone duets by other boys.

Source: Dundee Evening Telegraph – Thursday 16 December 1926 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Ranelagh Dye Works, Western Road

Dyers and cleaners, 278 Western Road. The factory was built in 1926/7. Initially traded as Beau Brummel (1928) Ltd.

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council,
Highways, New Streets and Buildings, and Lighting Committee
Tuesday, 9th November, 1926
Page 409

No. 902
Applicant: Ranelagh Dye Works
Nature and Situation:

New Factory, Western Road

Conditions governing approval:

Subject to Surveyor’s requirements being carried out

1934 OS Map

1934 OS Map

Mentioned in the 1930 Commercial Directory:

Ranelagh Dye Works (Beau Brummel (1928) Ltd. proprs.), dyers & cleaners. Western rd. T N 4093 (4 lines)

Also mentioned in the same directory:

Meads of Merton (Beau Brummel (1928) Ltd. proprs.), Christchurch rd. T elephone Wimbledon 0525

In the 1938 Commercial Directory, building numbers are given:

Beau Brummel Ltd. dyers & cleaners, 278 Western Road (Telephone 4092 [5 lines]) & 2 Christchurch Road. Liberty 1378


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Poulson’s Estate, Bond Road

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council
Highways, New Streets and Buildings, and Lighting Committee
Tuesday, 9th November, 1926
Page 408

17. Plans submitted for approval

No. 893
Applicant: Mr. H. Poulson
Nature and Situation:

Three roads and sewers, 116 houses, Bond Road (38 houses for subsidy)

Conditions governing approval:

Subject to the extension of Eveline Road retaining the same name.

The three roads referred to are assumed to be Plummer Lane, Mortimer Road and the extension to Eveline Road.

1934 OS Map

1934 OS Map

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Glebe Avenue

1952 OS Map

1952 OS Map

Possibly built in 1926/7 as the originally proposed name of St. Dunstan’s Avenue was rejected by the Urban District Council:

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council
Highways, New Streets and Buildings, and Lighting Committee
Tuesday, 14th September, 1926
Page 254

22. Name of street

– Read letter from Messrs Chart, Son & Reading suggesting on behalf of Mr G. Reader the names of Westfield Avenue and Glebe Avenue for the new street upon his estate, in lieu of St. Dunstan’s Avenue, which was previously submitted and disapproved.

Resolved, That the name of Glebe Avenue be approved.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Manor Road

In this 1913 OS Map, Manor Road was the name of the road at the northern edge of the Urban District boundary, and continued along past the Streatham Park Cemetery, then south towards Mitcham Common.

1913 OS Map

1913 OS Map

1913 OS Map

1913 OS Map

Parts of the road were renamed, after this suggestion in 1926:

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council
Highways, New Streets and Buildings, and Lighting Committee
Tuesday, 14th September, 1926

6. MANOR ROAD.

— Read letters from the Battersea District Post Office and the Streatham Park Cemetery Company suggesting the renaming of Manor Walk and a portion of Manor Road in order to prevent confusion.

Resolved to recommend, That the following names be adopted :

Manor Road, from Commonside East to a point 300 yards north-east of Willow Cottages ;

Northborough Road, from Manor Road to Croydon Boundary, and to be numbered from the Croydon end of the road ;

Rowan Road, from Manor and Northborough Road to Wandsworth boundary opposite No. 31, Greyhound Terrace ;

Greyhound Terrace, from Rowan Road to Lilian Road.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Lunstone Concrete Co.

LONDON CONTRACT FOR BEXHILL

The Lunstone Concrete Co., Ltd., the local firm who manufacture many varieties of concrete at their Glyne Gap works, have just obtained the contract for the supply of all the breeze slabs to be used on the housing scheme which the Mitcham Borough Council have recently started. This contract, which is expected to extend over a year, was gained in competition with several London and North Country firms.

As showing the difference between local and London housing condition, it might be mentioned that Mitcham is using brick for only the outer skin the ground floor walls and for the parting walls. All other walls and the internal partitions are to be breeze concrete, thus effecting a considerable saving in expense.

The Lunstone Concrete Company are manufacturing the blocks on the actual housing site. The first section of the scheme provides tor the erection of about 200 houses.

Source: Bexhill-on-Sea Observer – Saturday 06 February 1926 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)