Tag Archives: 1915

Arthur Edmund Hayne

During World War 1, Arthur Hayne’s photographers shop in Tooting offered free portrait photos to recruits.

His obituary from the Mitcham and Colliers Wood Gazette 8th May 1959 :

Death of Mr. Arthur Hayne
Former Well-Known Tooting Personality

We regret to record the death of Mr. Arthur Hayne of Carshalton Park Road, Carshalton. A former Tootingite, Mr. Hayne who was 91 years of age was actively associated with politics all his life.

He was well known 50 years ago as an open air speaker at Tooting Broadway for the Anti-Socialist Union, and he also addressed meetings at Mitcham Fair Green.

The Three Brothers

Born at Croydon, Mr. Hayne came to Tooting at the age of eight with his brothers James and Charles, and was connected with them in business at Tooting Broadway in the early part of the century. Arthur had a photographers shop, and James was a well-known Tooting news agent while Charles sold the papers outside a kiosk near the Tooting Baths.

Mr. Arthur Hayne did not take an active part in the political life of Tooting. He went to school at the church schools in Church Lane and later at Tooting Graveney Schools and was a member of the Tooting Parish Church choir in his younger days.

He moved to Mitcham some years ago and become chairman of the Mitcham Conservative Association. A staunch Conservative Mr. Hayne was well-known as a public speaker for the Conservative cause to which he devoted much of his spare time up to a few years ago. During the First World War he was a special constable.

When he moved to Carshalton he joined the Carshalton and Banstead Conservative Association and become vice chairman. Until a few months ago Mr. Hayne who was in business in London as a merchant was still working. He leaves a wife (formerly Miss Attlee of Tooting), two sons and two daughters.

The funeral was at Carshalton Parish Church.

In 1914, A. E. Hayne is listed in company 1 of the Mitcham Town Guard.

In the 1915 street directory, he was living at St. Cross, Graham Road, where he was also listed as the secretary of the Mitcham Conservative & Unionist Association.

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Bridge Road

Road that was off east, or right-hand, side of Christchurch Road, opposite Runnymede. It was closed in 1966.

In this 1952 OS map, the road is shown with a single terrace of eleven houses on the north side, numbered sequentially 1 to 11.

1952 OS map

1952 OS map

Aerial photo from 1947 shows the row of houses on the left side of the road.

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

29th April 1947 from Britain From Above

Aerial photo from 1949 shows the road looking to the west. The dome atop the tower on the right was Frys Metals factory.

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

19th March 1949 from Britain From Above

It is not mentioned in the 1891 street directory, but does have an entry in the 1911 commercial directory:

1, Harry Isaac CAVENDER, picture frame maker

and in the 1915 directory:

1, Henry BRYANT, confectioner

The road was closed in 1966:

Bridge Road is to be closed down

Bridge Road, a cul-de-sac off Christchurch Road, Mitcham is to be closed. Merton Council have given planning permission to Frys Metal Foundries Ltd., for redevelopment which involves the closing of the road.

The road was originally the principle means of access to residential properties which have since been demolished. It now serves the factory premises only.

RIGHTS OF ACCESS

The council agreed to give permission provided the council’s right of adequate access to the public sewers were preserved.

Also provided that the owner of the factory should take over the responsibility for the street lamps and cables in the road, and also bear any costs incurred in closing the road.

Frys have also offered land near Bridge Road to the council free of charge for the proposed widening of Christchurch Road. The offer has been accepted.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 13th May, 1966, page 1.

Occupants in 1939

1, Leonard Douglas and Elizabeth HAYNES
2, Mary Jane and Rosa FISK
3, William Charles and Alice Louisa and Christopher ADAMS
4, James and Maude BURLING
5, Robert and Gertrude MARSHALL
6, Alfred and Mabel Frances FORD
7, Robert and Doris May TAYLOR; Edith Mahala FRISWELL
8, James Alfred and Sarah Ellen DURLING
9, Henry William and Rose Florence and Florance DALTON
10, Ernest John and Flora BURLING
11, Charles Walter and Susan FRANCIS


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Anti-German Riots after sinking of the Lusitania

Anti-German riots broke out on the evening of Wednesday 12th May, 1915, in Tooting and the next day in Mitcham, in response to the sinking of the ship Lusitania.

ANTI-GERMAN RIOTS

Bakers’ Windows Broken

Several Arrests

The scenes of violence which have marked the public feeling against enemy aliens which has been aroused as a result of the Lusitania crime broke out in the neighbourhood on Wednesday evening. At Tooting Broadway a crowd commenced to assemble about 8 o’clock, but for some time it reached very large dimensions. Towards nine o’clock the gathering became more dense, and it was obvious that the baker’s shop owned by Mr P. Jung was in danger of assault. The police, who were reinforced, did their utmost to keep the crowd on the move, and prevented any congregating immediately outside the shop. Meanwhile Mr Jung closed his business as a precautionary measure, but this move was only greeted with jeers. Shortly before ten o’clock a loud crash of glass told that at least one missile had found the mark, a success which was boisterously cheered. The police continued to force the crowd to the opposite side of the road, but the passing of the trams enabled the mob to make some advances, which, however, were fortunately checked.

Every now and again more glass was smashed, and eventually there was very little left of the huge plate-glass windows which have helped to make Mr Jung’s shop such an attractive place of business. When the police did actually see a person throwing he was promptly arrested. Some ugly rushes were the result, and it is a matter for congratulation that no very serious conflicts occurred between the police and the public.

While the guardians of the law were straining every endeavour to cope with the crowd at the Broadway, now numbering some 2,000, a few persons commenced paying attention to the Hygienic Bakery, owned by a German, and situated further down the High-street, opposite the “Mercury” Offices. The roller shutters were lowered, but some spirits more determined than the rest wrenched them away from their fastenings, and with considerable noise they fell to the ground. Without loss of time a brick was hurled at the window with an accuracy of aim somewhat remarkable for a member of the fair sex, who made the claim of having drawn first blood. Other bricks and stones followed in quick succession with more or less precision, and one windows had hardly a particle of glass left in.

THE “SPECIALS” ARRIVE

At about 11 o’clock a strong contingent of special constables appeared on the scene, and were accorded a very mixed reception. The Tooting section was strengthened by a force from Mitcham, numbering about 70, under Inspector G.J. Poston. They were divided into sections, and did most useful work in helping the regular police to disperse the crowds.

Other shops were attacked in Garratt-lane, and all suffered in a like manner and to a similar extent. Police remained on guard all night and the next day, and as soons as carpenters could be procured the premises were boarded up, and in some cases the German traders packed up their goods and chattels and cleared off with all possible despatch.

ANTI-GERMAN DEMONSTRATIONS AT MITCHAM

Early last evening a crowd, which gradually swelled until about 8 o’clock, when it numbered several hundred persons, assembled at the Fair Green for the purpose of expressing indignation at the recent murders on the high seas.

Proceeding in the direction of the Parade, the crowd halted in front of the jeweller’s shop tenanted by Mr J. B. Rompel, a naturalised German.

Their attitude was distinctly menacing, and but for the prescence of a large force of Special Constabulary they would, no doubt, have vented their feelings in no unmistakeable manner. After some jeering and hooting the police dispersed the crowd.

With the exception of one man, whose head was cut with a stone, no damage or injury took place.

Source: Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, Friday, 14th May, 1915, page 4.

A photo of special constable recruited during the First World War is on Merton Memories.

Rose Nursery

Weatherboarded cottage in Tramway Path.

There are two photos of this cottage on the City of London ‘Collage’ collection, both with the year of 1977, so perhaps it was demolished after that.

Image courtesy of Collage - The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

1977 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

Image courtesy of Collage - The London Picture Library - http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

1977 Image courtesy of Collage – The London Picture Library – http://collage.cityoflondon.gov.uk

From the 1911 commercial directory:

Arthur George & Ephraim SIMMONS, florists, Tramway path, Lower Mitcham

The 1915 street directory names the cottage:

Tramway Path, from London Road, Lower Mitcham

George THOMPSON, florist (Station Nursery)
Ephraim SIMMONS, florist (Rose Nursery)

The cottage is shown on this 1953 OS map:

1953 OS map

1953 OS map

An area in the south ward called Simmons’ Land was recorded in UDC minutes of 1917 as being of 13 acres. This land was used for allotments during the war. From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District council, volume III, 1917 to 1918, 19th June, 1917, page 52.

Agnes Clarrissa Simmons, the daughter of Arthur George Simmons, married Private Percy John Hale in February 1916. She lived with her parents in Elmwood Road.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Preshaw Crescent

Photo taken 2nd January, 2017

Photo taken 2nd January, 2017

Photo possibly taken after the houses were built.

Photo possibly taken after the houses were built.

A row of four pairs of houses from the corner with Glebe Path running west, in parallel with, but set back from, Lower Green West. Built after 1897 on the site of a pond, which is shown in this 1866 map:

1866 OS map

1866 OS map

According to Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories: 5 Lower Green West, page 11, the pond measured 200 feet by 50 feet and had been called King’s Pond. The sub-soil here is sand and gravel and Montague suggested that this was originally a pit dug for the gravel, which would be used in building. With the water table high the pit would have filled in with water forming the pond.


The year of 1897 comes from the Land Registry title for number 6, which was auctioned in early 2016:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father In God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

The restrictive covenant contained in the conveyance of 2nd September 1897 stated that …

the purchaser would within 12 months of the date of abstracting presents erect not less than 4 detached houses or two pairs of semi detached houses on the premises.

That no buildings other than dwelling houses with their offices should be erected on the premises the prime cost of which for work and materials should not be less than £400 or in case of pairs of semi-detached dwellinghouses should not be less prime cost than £650 per pair.


This 1910 OS map shows the four pairs of houses:

1910 OS Map

1910 OS Map

Occupants

From the 1915 street directory:

Lower green west, from London Road
NORTH SIDE

… here is Glebe Path
PRESHAW CRESCENT:
1, Charles STUART
3, George Henry NELSON
4, Robert CHART
5, Arthur LANGRISH
7, Charles Clarke APLIN
8, John David CLARKE

From the 1925 street directory:

Lower green west, from London Road to Church Road
WEST SIDE

PRESHAW CRESCENT:
1, Charles STUART
2, Miss Bessie May MARTIN
3, George NELSON
4, John William ALLEN
5, Arthur LANGRISH
6, Charles R SINCLAIR
7, Mrs HOLLIS
8, Herbert E HART
9, George W.T. ORMOND

Note that number 9 is possibly the White Cottage.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Prince Georges Road

Road off east side of junction of Christchurch Road and Church Road, opposite Liberty Avenue. It was within the Mitcham Urban District although as letters were delivered from Merton, it acquired a SW19 post code.

In the 1891 street directory it was listed as Prince of Wales Road, probably in connection with the nearby Prince of Wales pub.

Prince of Wales road (Merton)
from Merton Lane
William Croft, pig dealer
Walter Shepherd, pig dealer
Henry Davison, pig dealer
Benjamin Bolton, pig dealer
Stephen Holloway, pig dealer
Charles Leaver, pig dealer
George Thatcher, pig dealer
Joseph Randall, pig dealer
Singlegate Schools

1895 OS map

1895 OS map

In this 1895 map, it is shown as Prince’s Road.

1911 OS map

1911 OS map

The 1915 directory shows 2 pig dealers:

Prince’s Road (Merton)
from Western Road

NORTH SIDE

Singlegate Council Schools
(girls & infants)

3 Robert Davison, pig dealer
11 William Whittick, pig dealer

The road led to land that used by London colleges as playing fields, as shown in the 1930 Commercial Directory:

Battersea & Chelsea Polytechnics, athletic ground, Princes rd. T N 0852
The Esco Sports & Social Club (A. P. Lawson, sec. ),Princes rd
James Ferguson & Sons Ltd. ebonite dust mfrs. Princes rd. T A “ Nestorius, Toot; ” T N 2283

Which has led to the names of the business parks College Fields, at the eastern end of Prince Georges Road and Chelsea Fields, off Western Road.

The name of this road was changed after a request by the London County Council. They said that there were 10 Prince’s Roads in the LCC area with 4 of these were in the SW19 district. The Borough of Mitcham decided in 1934 to change Princes Road to Prince Georges Road.

1952 OS map

1952 OS map

Glenask, Albert Road

Name of a house in Albert Road, and possibly number 47 as:

From the Surrey Recruitment Registers:

J A FINDLAY of Glenask, Albert Road, aged 29 Years 1 Months, Cashier. Conscripted on 9 May 1916 to the London Regiment (15th Batn).

From the 1915 street directory:

47, John Alexander FINDLAY