Tag Archives: 1889

Graham Avenue

Road off east side of Streatham Road, north of Graham Road.

1894-os-map-graham-avenue

Built in the late 19th century on land previously occupied by The Willows, described by Eric Montague in his book Mitcham Histories : 2 North Mitcham, page 74, as having

extensive stabling, farmery, meadows and gardens

. The roads Graham Road, Elmfield Avenue and Fernlea Road were also built in this land. The address “Graham Avenue, Willows Estate” was used in this auction ad from 1889:

Almost without reserve. Tooting Junction. Within a few minutes of the railway station and easy distance of Mitcham Junction, from whence there is an excellent service of trains to London Bridge, Ludgate Hill, or Victoria. For Occupation or Investment.

Messrs. FURZE ALDRIDGE Will Sell by Auction at the Mart, Tokenhouse Yard, E.C.. Tuesday, June 4th, Twelve for One o’clock, THE DETACHED FREEHOLD RESIDENCES situate and being Nos. 43 and 75, Graham Avenue, Willows Estate, Mitcham, near Tooting Junction, detached, double-fronted, and most conveniently planned on two floors only ; they occupy a choice position and are close to shops, &c. contain on first floor four bedrooms, bath room (hot and cold) water, w.c.; the ground floor dining room and elegant drawing room, 26-ft. long, large kitchen and scullery, and other domestic conveniences ; large garden front and rear; wide sideway. At present in hand, but of the estimated rental value of £50 per annum each. May be viewed by order of the Auctioneers. Particulars and conditions of sale obtained of Messrs. Heather Sons, Solicitors, 17, Paternoster Row, E.C.; and of the Auctioneers their Offices, Railway Bridge, High-road, Streatham, at Norwood Junction and Thornton Heath.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 01 June 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


The 1915 street directory lists the occupants in the order encountered when walking from Figgs Marsh to Fernlea Road. The house names are in brackets.

SOUTH SIDE

from Figg’s marsh

Mrs Munday (Russellton)
Mrs Page (Glenfield)
Frederick George Taylor (Roseneath)
Clemence William Benger (Woodbine)
Alfred Shott (Edgemont)
William Court (Wardown)
Allan Reed (Woodside)

NORTH SIDE

William Frederick Wontner (Fairlawn)
James Henry Ellis (Melita)
Walter Wilson (Elm cottage)
Miss Marlow (Shirley)
John Gray (Homeland)
George Arthur Cramp (Mayville)
Miss Hunt (Oakdene)
Charles Kendall (Stoneleigh)
Ernest Charles Newton (Cyril villa)

… here is Elmfield Avenue

Frederick Moon (Lynton)
Frederick Holmesworth (Ashley)
John Newson (Sunnyside)
Thomas Gordon Richards (Cloveley)
Edward Hagon (Primrose)
Percy Babb (Pevensey)


The 1891 street directory:

from Figg’s marsh

NORTH SIDE

Mrs Freeman (Glenfield)
F.G. Taylor (Roseneath)

SOUTH SIDE

Charles Frderick Woodward (The Elms)
Mrs Noble (Fairlawn)

World War 1 Connections
Private Ernest Newsom

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Advertisements

1889 Dog stolen from landlord of the Bath Tavern

MITCHAM.

Strange Proceedings.

—At the Town Hall, Croydon, on Saturday, Charles Dawson, was charged with wilfully breaking the gate and entering the yard the rear of the Bath Tavern, Belgrave-road, Mitcham, and with stealing therefrom a lurcher bitch and dog collar on Jan. 17th, valued at £1, the property of Joseph Gilbert, the landlord.

—Prosecutor said defendant had been a customer of his. The dog was loose in his garden on the 17th. and gone the next morning. The value of the bitch was £1. He knew it originally belonged to defendant. Joseph Omigold said on the night of the 17th he met defendant, who said prosecutor had his dog in his yard, and he meant to get it. He then deliberately pulled down the gate, and went in the yard and fetched the dog out

Defendant: The dog of no value; it is big and good for nothing, like the landlord.

—P-.c. 476 W said he apprehended defendant his home on Friday evening. He said I had known I would not have sent the old woman round with the dog this morning.”

—Defendant was remanded for a week so that some arrangement might be made with the prosecutor to the repair of the gate.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 26 January 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

6th May 1899 Mitcham School Board

MITCHAM SCHOOL BOARD

The usual monthly meeting of the School Board for Mitcham was held at the Board-room (Vestry Hall) on Monday evening. The Rev. D.F. Wilson presided, and the other members present were Messrs. F. Tomlin, W. Mears, James Clarke, Jasper Knight, B. Green, J. Brown, and Kemshead.

THE EXAMINATIONS.

From Her Majesty’s Inspector’s report on the recent examination of the Lower Mitcham School it appeared that the boys had passed a very successful examination and that the first standard had passed without single failure. The second was good, and the upper standards just got through. The girls had passed good examination. The arithmetic was less successful, but the grammar, geography, needlework, singing, and musical drill were good, and the tone of the school all that it should be. The infants had also passed a very successful examination. The average attendance at the boys’ school was 197, and the grant earned was £l70 14s. 8d. ; at the girls’ school the average attendance was 57, and the grant earned £59 5s. 6d. ; and at the infants’ school the average attendance was 98, and the grant earned £73 10s.— making total grant of £303 10s. 2d.

In answer to the Chairman the Clerk said the amount of the grant earned at the Lower Mitcham Schools last year was £277 7s. 5d.

The Chairman—Then the examination this year has been very satisfactory.

AN APPLICATION.

Mr. Harber, one of the head-masters, applied for an increase salary. He said his present salary was £145, and considered that his income should be proportionate to the size the school. The letter was referred committee for consideration.

Mr. Hossack, assistant-master at Lower Mitcham Schools, also applied for an increase of salary, and his application was similarly treated.

THE TREASURER’S BALANCE.

The Chairman stated that the balance in the hands of the treasurer was £257 10s. 5d.
The Finance Committee recommended the payment of current accounts amounting £517 Mr. Knight proposed, and Mr. Mears seconded, that the report should adopted.
The Chairman pointed out that they were drawing cheques for £500 and they had only £250 in hand.
The Clerk said the overseers would pay in £250 on Wednesday morning, and that before the week was out the grant on account of the Lower Mitcham Schools would be received.
It was decided to pass the report of the Finance Committee, but to hold over the cheques until there is sufficient cash in the hank to meet them.

ANOTHER LAWYER’S BILL

The Clerk said he had received letter from Messrs. Ward, Mills, and Co., solicitors, enclosing a bill of costs for £37 I3s. 7d. for acting for the trustees on the proposed transfer of the infants’ school at Lower Mitcham. They stated that they were told by Messrs. Gedge to send the bill to the Board. They asked for cheque soon as possible, as the bill had been running for four years. A second letter had been received asking when they might expect the cheque.

The Chairman said it might simplify matters if he stated that Ward, Mills, and Co. were the solicitors to the late Mr. William Simpson, who was the sole surviving trustee of the schools.

Mr. Tomlin said Ward, Mills, and Co. in their letter stated that Messrs. Gedge and Co. informed them that they should charge their account to the School Board. Could the chairman give any information to that and to who instructed Ward, Mills, and Co. to act for the Board. The simple fact of the matter appeared to be that there was nothing on the minutes authorising Ward, Mills, and Co. to act, and whatever the Board had to with Ward, Mills, and Co. had been through Messrs. Gedge. The whole of the negotiations appeared be conspicuous by the failures. The trustees did not know that the school had not been transferred, and it was not an unfair question to ask who had acted all through the piece? So far as he could understand Mr. Gedge and Mr. Wilson, their chairman, were the only two who had had anything to with it, and under those circumstances thought he was right in asking why Mr. Gedge had been allowed not only to act as trustee and solicitor, but also to give instructions as to the payment of the bill of costs of another solicitor. At the last meeting Mr. Legg told the Board that he was not a trustee, and that was simply appointed a trustee pro forma in order to facilitate the transfer of the schools. But the transfer had never taken place, and no sooner had Gedge’s bill been paid than put the other people on the track of the Board. What business had Gedge to refer Ward, Mills, and Co. to the Board, and to state that the Board were responsible? The whole matter required the serious consideration of the Board, and the bill should most decidedly be repudiated. If the schools had been transferred he could understand the account being paid, but the schools had not been transferred, and the Board had never instructed Ward, Mills, and Co. to act for them. If Messrs. Gedge and Co. had done so they should pay the bill. (Hear, hear.)

Mr. Brown said he would like to see the whole of the correspondence produced in connection with this affair from the earliest part, and they should also obtain from Gedge & Co, such information as they could get from them in the shape of correspondence. He wanted to know more about the matter. (Hear, hear.)

Mr. Tomlin said he really thought that after all the trouble the Board had had over Gedge’s account the trustees should take the initiative and something in this matter. That the trustees should have allowed one gentleman take the entire management of the whole thing showed a very bad state of affairs. The Chairman he said was not a trustee of the schools. Mr. Wm. Simpson was the sole surviving trustee, and the former Board instructed Messrs, Gedge & Co, to obtain a transfer of the infant school at Lower Mitcham from Mr. Wm Simpson to the Board. He had been looking through the correspondence, which was quite open for the Board to see, and he found one letter in which Mr. Simpson said would decline to transfer the schools except the advice Messrs. Ward, Mills & Co., his solicitors. He (the chairman) was simply a trustee with the other six gentlemen in order take possession the school and transfer it to the Board. He knew no more about the matter than the other gentlemen. He had the misfortune to be both member of the Board and a trustee, but he really had no information to give, and if he had would not withhold it for single moment. He had privately spoken to the trustees, and their opinion was that the Board wished the school transferred the initiative should come from the Board by proposing some terms. As to the account before them, he thought they should call upon Gedge & Co. to produce the whole of the correspondence.

Mr. Tomlin — We should also ask Gedge & Co. upon what authority they informed Ward, Mills Co. that we are liable. Mr. Clarke said he thought they should discuss the matter then. No business had been done, and yet two accounts had been sent in and one paid. He would like know what the present account was for. The schools had not been transferred, and when they were transferred the Board would called upon to pay similar set costs. Mr. Brows promised that the matter should be adjourned, and that in the meantime the Clerk should obtain from Gedge & Co. full particulars about the account.
Mr. Clarke — We should take no notice of the bill. What is the bill for?
Mr. Brown — We should write a letter ignoring our liability, but ask for further information without prejudice.
Mr. Clarke — Will someone kindly tell me what the account is for.
The Chairman — That is just the information we are anxious obtain. The motion was then carried.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 11 May 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1889 Storm

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 20 July 1889

MITCHAM.
Wednesday’s Storm.

—About 2 p.m. on Wednesday afternoon, during a heavy thunder storm, the electric fluid struck a chimney at the shop of Mr. Hannington, baker, Lower Mitcham, and did considerable damage, destroying an air pipe and igniting the gas. Mr. Hannington was, fortunately, at home, and succeeded in extinguishing it, otherwise more serious damage would have had to be recorded. As it was, mischief was wrought to the extent of nearly £10. A chimney was also slightly struck at a house Golden-terrace, Beddington Corner, in the occupation of Mr. G. Harris, during the same storm, hut the damage in this case was not very serious.

Street Lighting – Gas

Merton Memories photos

Next to milestone, without glass
1950 opposite Kings Head
Causeway
Three gas lamps along Causeway in 1909
Outside Vestry Hall in 1902
1870 from Causeway towards White House

Stories

Saturday 7th September 1889

MITCHAM.

The Lighting Question.

— A public meeting the ratepayers the parish was held the Vestry Hall on Thursday evening for the purpose of considering the expediency of rescinding the following resolution, passed at meeting of the ratepayers of the parish the 29th day of October, 1853 ; “Resolved unanimously that the number inspectors carry into execution the provisions of the Act, third and fourth William IV., cap. 90, in this parish (so far as relates to lighting) be seven,” and of passing resolution enabling the Vestry elect such inspectors with those already in office will make a total number of twelve inspectors of lighting for the parish.

— Dr. J. Ferrier Clarke, Vicars warden, having been voted to the chair, he informed the meeting that solicitors’ and counsel’s opinion had been asked upon the question, and a telegram had just been received to the effect that it was impossible, in consequence of being vacation the Courts, get counsel’s decision until Monday, when the matter could be considered at the adjourned Vestry meeting to be held on that day.

— Mr. Dungate, of the Singlegate Ratepayers’ Association, moved that the business on, and his motion was seconded by Mr. Wortley and carried.

— Messrs. Nobes, John Nicholls, and Dr. Love having spoken against, and Dr. Kemshead, the Rev. Mr. Richman, and others, in favour, it was put to the meeting with the following result: For 31, against 28.

— As the beaten party challenged the figures, it was decided that all ratepayers present should have their names taken down by the chairman, which resulted in the figures being altered to : For 34, against 23.

— It was then proposed by Mr. Wortley and seconded by Mr. Newman that the number increased to 12, and as only six voted against it was carried.

— Mr. Phil. Sampson, senr., as usual, interrupted every speaker who did not agree with him, and the Gas Company whipped up all their officials to oppose the rescinding of the resolution vote thanks to the chairman closed the meeting, which was of a rather lively character.

Source: Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 07 September 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


Saturday 10th August 1889

MITCHAM AND THE LIGHTING QUESTION.

PROPOSAL TO LIGHT WITH OIL.

An Adjourned meeting of the Mitcham Ratepayers’ Association was held in the Boys’ School, Lower Mitcham, on Wednesday evening, to again discuss the question of the lighting of the district. Mr. Sandall was voted to the chair, and amongst those present were Messrs. W. Jenner, J. Brown, Wright, G. Bullock, W. Thomas, Dungate, Gardner, Muad, W. Tilley, A. R. Harwood, Wortley, Hill, Langridge, Blackstone, Tomlin, Jordan, W. Barter, and Dr. Kemshead.

The Chairman, in opening the proceedings, explained the objects of the association to those who were not yet members of it, assuring them that by attending Vestry meetings and keeping a watchful eye on those officers who were paid by the ratepayers, their interests were safeguarded and abuses rendered next to impossible. Public officers were likely to become lax in the performance of their duties if such a body as the Ratepayers’ Association were not in existence to watch their movements. Coming to the subject to consider which that meeting was held, he unfolded the plan the sub-committee, previously appointed, had resolved to recommend. At present the parish was lighted by the Gas Company for nine months out of the twelve from sunset to half-past one o’clock in the morning at a charge of £3 per lamp per annum. What the committee suggested was that oil should be adopted instead, when the lamps could be lighted every night all the year round at a charge that would not exceed £2 9s. 6d. per lamp per annum. He pointed out that this estimate was a literal one, and would allow them a fair margin to work upon, as Wimbledon, which had adopted oil lighting, was able to carry it out satisfactorily at an annual cost of £2 6s. 8d. per lamp. The present system of lighting by gas, he said, was a most unsatisfactory one. Reckoning each lamp to burn five cubic feet of gas per hour, and the cost 3s. 10d. per 1,000 feet, he was certain that they were paying the Gas Company more than they ought to. They were therefore justified in the course they proposed to take, and if they were well supported it would probably have the effect of bringing the Gas Company round, and making an offer to light the lamps every night all year round, at £3 per lamp, the old terms. If the ratepayers resolved to adopt oil lighting, it would mean saving to them every year over the price of gas of 10s. 6d. per lamp, and that surely was something worth striving after. (Applause.)

Dr. Kemshead then presented a report on the subject he had been instructed to prepare. He said as at present arranged, with no lamps from May to August, they might take it that if the lamps were lighted for the period ending in May from 8.30 p.m. to 1.30 a.m., and for the period ending December from 3.30 p.m. to 1.30 a.m., the average would be 7 1/2 hours per night ; whilst if they were kept alight every night in the year the average would be nine hours per night. Now, what was the consumption gas? Each lamp consumed five cubic feet of gas per hour, which, calculated at nine hours per night all the year round, would give a consumption of 3,304 cubic feet per lamp per year, which, again, at 3s. 10d. per 1,000 cubic feet, would amount in the year to £824 18s. 8d. or for nine months to £6lB 14s. At 7 1/2 hours per night all the year round the cost would be £687 8s. 7d., and for nine months £464 0s. 6d. Thus while the Gas Company at present lighted the lamps for an average of 7 1/2 hours per night for nine months and charged £804 12s., while gas consumed at their own price cost £6l8 14s., they evidently charged a good deal more than they had a right to. The cost of oil-lighting he estimated as follows:- Oil, per year, £351; labour of five men in the lighting, extinguishing, and cleaning of the lamps 30s. per week each, wicks, breakages, and sundries, £34; total, £645. This gave cost of £2 9s. 5d. per lamp per year, and this showed annual saving, compared with gas, of £167 14s. Along with this saving there would light all the year round from sunset to sunrise. Dr Kemshead suggested that the Gas Company should again be communicated with, and another meeting of the ratepayers held before the August Vestry meeting, to decide upon their final course of action. He believed if the company were properly approached they would not object to a compromise.

Mr. Wortley next addressed the meeting. He contended that the oil lamps the association had on view gave a much better light than gas, and could see no feasible reason why oil should not be adopted for future lighting purposes.

Mr. Dungate pointed out that better gas was made in the Workhouse at 1s. 6d. per 1,000, and 3s. 10d. per 1,000 charged by the Gas Company was exorbitant. He believed that the Lighting Inspectors would not move without pressure from the ratepayers through the Ratepayers’ Association, many of the ratepayers being afraid of them. He held that if once they resolved to have oil they would never again resort to gas, but before they did anything he was of the opinion that it would be wise to again approach the Gas Company. (Hear, hear.)

Mr. Tomlin then moved the following resolution:- “That the secretaries of the two Ratepayers’ Associations be instructed to write to the directors of the Gas Company asking if the company is prepared light all the street lamps from sunset to sunrise all the year round for per lamp per annum.’’ Mr. Tomlin remarked that they did not wish to do the company any harm, but they were determined to have value for their money. (Applause.)

Mr. Thomas seconded the resolution, which was then adopted unanimously. The following resolution was also unanimously adopted on the proposition of Mr. Dungate, seconded by Mr. Wortley:- “That no person be voted for at the coming election of inspectors unless such person pledges himself to obtain considerable reduction in the price of gas, or failing that to consent to light the parish with oil.””

Tbe Chairman urged upon those present not to forget to attend the next Vestry meeting, and to do their best place the question of oil-lighting before tbeir fellow-ratepayers. After some further discussion, a vote of thanks was accorded to the chairman, and the proceedings concluded.

Source: from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


Two advertisements requesting tenders for 50 iron lamp posts and a supply of gas. From the South Eastern Gazette 8th November 1853

CONTRACT for the SUPPLY of FIFTY IRON LAMP POSTS, with lamps and fittings complete for lighting the same with Gas, for the parish of Mitcham, at per post, etc., including the fixing in such parts of the parish as may be determined by the inspectors.
Persons desirous of contracting for the above are requested to send in their tenders to the Buck’s Head Inn, Mitcham, on or before the 22nd November instant, directed to the Secretary to the Inspectors. The Board will not pledge themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order of the Board,
FRANCIS NEWMAN,
Secretary.
Nov, 4th, 1853.

CONTRACT for the SUPPLY of GAS in the Public Lamps of the parish of Mitcham, at per 1000 feet. Persons willing to undertake the above contract, during the winter months, are requested to send in their tenders to the Buck’s Head Inn, Mitcham, on or before the 22nd November instant, directed to the Secretary to the Inspectors. The Board will not pledge themselves to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order of the Board,
FRANCIS NEWMAN, Secretary.
Nov. 4th, 1853.


Volunteer Fire Brigade

Mitcham’s fire brigade was a volunteer service until 1920, when Albert Wells was appointed Chief Officer. He introduced retaining fees for the chief and sub officers at each station, and remunerations for drills and call-outs for the firemen.

Stories from the British Newspaper Archive

(subscription required)

Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 07 September 1889

The Volunteer Fire Brigade.

—The annual test drill of the brigade took place on Wednesday evening, when the men mustered in full force and arrived at the tanyard, Beddington Corner, with their engine punctually at six p.m., and in about three minutes got to work with one jet. To this was shortly added another, junction being made in the hose about ten yards from the engine ; another connection was rapidly made from the engine with additional hose, and three powerful jets of water were concentrated on point where an imaginary fire was raging. A correspondent who witnessed the drill is of opinion that from observations made and the excellent espirit de corps shown the men, that this, as an entirely volunteer brigade, in a position to cope with any emergency which may arise in the vicinity. An essential point with men who give their time and labour gratis is having confidence in their leader, and this the Mitcham men certainly have in Superintendent A. R. Harwood. The following members of the committee were present to witness the proceedings, viz., Mr. S. Wells (chairman), Mr. Harwood, sen., Dr. Love, Mr. Sampson, and Mr. S. Love.


Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 23 February 1889

MITCHAM.
The Mitcham Volunteer Fire Brigade.

— The committee of this brigade entertained the members to dinner on Wednesday evening, at the Old Nag’s Head, Upper Mitcham. Mr. Wells, the chairman committee, occupied the chair, and Mr. A. R. Harwood, the superintendent of the brigade, the vice-chair. There were present Messrs. W. R. Harwood, Dr. Love, F. G. Sampson, R. M Chart. S. Love, and W. Jenner, members of the committee, and the brigade with the turncock and call-boys. An excellent repast was put upon the table by Mr Tomlin, and served in his best style, to which ample justice was done. The usual loyal toasts were also given, with that of the brigade, committee, &c. and a most enjoyable evening was spent. During the evening some capital songs were rendered by Messrs Shepherd, Brown, Dill, Turner, and others.


Agricultural Express – Saturday 25 February 1893

MITCHAM.

FIRE.

—On Thursday morning a fire, which originated in a store used for frying fish, broke out at 2, Rock-terrace. The rafters in the chimney had caught alight, but the volunteer fire brigade were able to extinguish the flames with a few buckets of water. The house was occupied by woman named Patience Stone.


Cock Chimney Factory in Batsworth Road

A local landmark in Batsworth Road, off Church Road, Mitcham. It is possible it may have been built in mid 19th century. The land was sold to London Borough of Merton in late 1960s, and the area is now occupied by a trading estate.

The firm of Donald Macpherson occupied the site until 1969, and the chimney had their brand ‘Foochow’ in letters running down the side of the chimney. Macpherson was started in 1884 as a paint, varnish and Chinese lacquer business, based in Manchester. The company’s telegram address was ‘Foochow, Manchester’.

Macphersons Trade Paints became part of the Crown Paints Group in 2008.

The chimney was first mentioned in Croydon Advertiser and East Surrey Reporter – Saturday 17 August 1889 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Fatal Fall from a Chimney.

—An inquest was held at the Mortuary on Saturday last before Mr. R. D. Muir, deputy coroner, and a jury, concerning the death of Thomas H. Haslam, 25, Cow Cross-street, St. Luke’s, an engineer’s fitter. It appeared that on the previous Thursday the deceased, with a labourer, was sent to some repairs to what is known the “Cock” chimney at a varnish factory in Church-lane, and, having engaged lodgings at 15, Holmwood-road, proceeded to inspect the shaft.

Having ascended to some considerable height, deceased by some means lost his hold and fell with great force to the bottom.

Medical aid was summoned, and the man removed to his lodgings, where expired the same night.

The jury having viewed the body and having heard the medical and other evidence, and the Deputy-Coroner very carefully summed up, a verdict of “Accidental Death” was returned.


1945 ad

Donald Macpherson co. Ltd., Cock Chimney Works, Mitcham (paint manufacturers), require the following clerical staff: 2 Invoice Clerks. Order Clerks, Shorthand-Typists, Telephone Operator; good post-war prospects, possibility of advancement. Please reply to the above address or telephone for appointment, Mitcham 2963.

Source: Surrey Advertiser – Saturday 13 January 1945 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)


aerial photo from 1947 and 1952 OS map

aerial photo from 1947 and 1952 OS map

Merton Memories Photos
JJ Schweizer
Foochow
1970

From the phone book

1910

1910

1912

1912 to 1914

1915 Heyl phone

1915 and 1916

1919

1919 to 1921

1923

1923

1926

1926

1968

1968


From the minutes of the
Town Planning and Development Committee
31st October 1968

1266. COCK CHIMNEY WORKS, BATSWORTH ROAD, MITCHAM

– The Borough Surveyor reported that the Cock Chimney Works, which occupied four detached sites in Batsworth Road and Chapel Road comprising a total area of approximately 1.56 acres, had been offered for sale to the Council. He explained that the works were situated in an area allocated primarily for industrial use in the Initial Development Plan, but which had been re-allocated primarily for residential use in the First Review of the Plan now before the Minister of Housing and Local Government. He reported: —

(i) that the works were within an area at present being studied with a view to environmental improvement and adjoined other property which had been purchased by the Council, or its predecessors. for ultimate redevelopment for residential purposes;

(ii) that, to implement planning objectives in the area, the acquisition of the works had to be firstly considered from a town planning point of view and secondly as a prospective housing site; and

(iii) upon the estimated cost of acquiring other properties in the neighbourhood to form a viable site for residential redevelopment and on the likely housing gain which would be achieved.

Resolved – That the Borough Surveyor be authorised to negotiate terms for the purchase of the Cock Chimney Works and requested to report further to a subsequent meeting.

Source: Minutes of Proceedings of the Council and committees, London Borough of Merton, Volume 5 1968-69, page 806


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Borough Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.