Category Archives: Roads

Gardeners Arms Pub Sign

The Gardeners Arms pub, 107 London Road, Mitcham, had a heraldic style sign hanging from a post in the centre of the wall on the upper floor. In November 2017, the sign couldn’t be found by the new landlord.

There are three photographs on Merton Memories, and none show a sign attached, for example, this one from 1989:

Clip from Merton Memories photo Mit_21_11-2 copyright London Borough of Merton.

This undated black an white photo shows flower baskets hanging from the wall:

Clip from Merton Memories photo Mit_21_11-1 copyright London Borough of Merton.

The late Eric Montague, of the Merton Historical Society, took a slide of 109 & 111 London Road in 1966, and this included the pub, which has no sign.

A 1973 photo on the Collage collection also doesn’t show the sign:

1973

The only photograph found so far showing the sign is from Google Street View, from 2008:-

The sign is blurred when zooming in, but what can be seen is shield with a blue background, a white chevron with two objects above and three or more below. The shield has two supporters, one of which may be a gardener. The Surrey Coats of Arms, online at the Surrey History centre website, have been searched for Mitcham arms, and none of these have a field of blue with a white chevron.

Street View of 2012 shows no sign:

2012

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Florogen Ltd.

Listed in the 1938 commercial directory as perfume manufacturers, at 132 Western Road, Mitcham. Telephone numbers 2027 and 2028.

Comments on the Mitcham History Facebook group suggest the company was there in 1961, but as it’s not listed in the 1963 List of Factories, it may have gone out of business by then, or moved.

Blake Road

Road off Miles Road that leads to Collingwood and Rodney Roads. Built in 1930, by Mr J. Sands.

According to minutes of the Mitcham Urban Council, the original name suggested for this road was Felix Road, and that for Collingwood Road was San Road. The council suggested to Mr Sands the current names. Source: page 813, volume XV, Highways and Buildings Committee, 6th March 1930.

No houses were built on Blake Road. However it does have a block of four flats, numbered 1 to 4, at 30 Blake Road, CR4 3FB. This is a block between the Lloyds Pharmacy, at 75 to 79 Miles Road, and the terrace of houses in that end at number 69. The ground floor of this block facing Miles Road is number 71 in that road, occupied by a carpet and upholstery cleaning business. The entrance to the flats is in Blake Road.

1953 OS map


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Plummer Lane

Road running north-westerly from Bond Road and Eveline Road.

Possibly built by H. Paulson in around 1926/7. A terrace of six houses on each side of the road, numbered odd on the west side, as 1 to 11 going north, and even on the east side 2 to 12. Royal Mail postcode lookup in 2017 shows 13 properties in CR4 3HR, with the addition of 2A.

1951 OS map

From the minutes of the Mitcham Urban District Council, Highways and Buildings Committee, on 7th November, 1929, page 469, the residents of Plummer Lane had written to the council asking for it to be renamed. The council said that:

the name was originally suggested to perpetuate the name of the Plummer family, who had left certain moneys for the benefit of the parish, which moneys are included in the sum administered by the Trustees of the Mitcham United Charities. … the residents were to be informed that the Committee saw no adequate reason for any change.

Thomas Plummer’s charity was created out of his will of 1641. Bread was to be handed out by the parish church, every Sunday, to the local poor. Source: Reports of the Commissioners Appointed in Pursuance of Acts of … concerning Charities and Education of The Poor, Volume 33.


News Articles

Dundee Evening Telegraph – Thursday 30 August 1928 (via the British Newspaper archive)

GIRL DRAGGED ALONG BY MOTOR CAR MUDGUARD.

As an ambulance was returning along London Road, Mitcham, with an accident case the driver, E. Hedger, heard a bump, and saw in his mirror a girl being carried along on the mudguard of a motor car that had just passed him. He stopped the ambulance, and picked up Hettie Sinclair, of Plummer Lane, Mitcham, who after stepping off a tramcar was caught by the motor car.

“It is my 14th birthday to-day,” she said as she was being taken to a doctor for treatment. She was taken home in the ambulance.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Public Convenience opposite Ravensbury Arms

1962 clip from Merton memories photo, reference Mit_​Streets_​Col_​Cro_​16-5 copyright London Borough of Merton

Built around 1930/1 as discussed as item (3) below in the council minutes of the Mitcham Urban District council, volume XVI, 1930 to 1931, page 101

PUBLIC CONVENIENCES.

The Surveyor submitted the following report June 3rd, 1930.

Dear Mr. Chart,

Re SITES FOR PUBLIC CONVENIENCES.

I suggest to the Committee the following’ sites for their consideration :

(1) Short cul-de-sac roadway off High Street, Colliers Wood,
opposite Christchurch Road, and adjacent to The Victory PH.

(2) The northern extremity of Figges Marsh, at the junction of
Gorringe Park Avenue and London Road.

(3) At the junction of New Road and Croydon Road, adjacent to the Ravensbury Arms.

The first one will drain to the sewer by gravitation, and in the remaining two positions pumping will have to be resorted to.

I think that it is essential that the conveniences in the first two positions be constructed underground, but with respect to the third site, the Committee might consider incorporating the existing tramway shelter in an overground convenience at this point.

If the general opinion is in favour of underground, the alternative to No. 3 would be at the other end of New Road, at its junction with Commonside East. I think that it is just possible to drain an underground convenience by gravitation into the soil sewer.

Yours obediently,

RILEY SCHOFIELD, Assoc.M.Inst.C.E.,
Engineer and Surveyor.

RESOLVED, That the Surveyor be instructed to prepare a further report showing the cost of providing sanitary conveniences at Colliers Wood on the site suggested.

Note that New Road is now called Cedars Avenue.

1953 OS map


Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Connect House

Office building, 21 Willow Lane, Mitcham, CR4 4FL.

Bought on 29th January 2015 for £3,100,000 by CONNECT HOUSE LTD (Co. Regn. No. 9296558) of Unit 9, Ravensdale Industrial Estate, Timberwharf Road, London N16 6DB. Source: Land Registry, title number TGL100496, obtained November 2017.

The land was used to grow watercress by Gaston DUTRIEZ, who bought the property from William Francis Joseph SIMPSON in 1922. Source: Land Registry title and 1930 Commercial directory.

In 2012, Google Street View shows the building as Connect House Serviced Offices, by a company called Frendcastle. On 8th November 2017, BBC London reported that the building was being used by four local councils as temporary housing, with rooms costing between £30 and £40 per night. A Royal Mail postcode search for the address shows 84 flats.

2016 Street View

2012 Street View

1938 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Charles Catt and Son Furniture in Western Australia

From the Mitcham and Colliers Wood Gazette, 12th September, 1969, page 5.

Mitcham Family Who Went To Western Australia

Now Among Leading Furniture Manufacturers

A former Mitcham cabinet maker, who migrated to Western Australia in 1961 from Riverside Drive, Mitcham, now owns one of the leading quality furniture manufacturing businesses in the State capital, Perth.

Mr. Charles Catt, 59, his wife Grace and their son Roy, run the firm Charles Catt and Son, whose reputation for making quality furniture has been founded on the West Australian hardwood, jarrah – once thought only suitable for railway sleepers or timber construction work. However they have made it fashionable to have jarrah wood furniture in the home and now export it to other parts of Australia.

Mr. Charles Catt left his son behind in London when he went to Australia, so that he could complete his diploma course at the London Furniture College. When Roy arrived a few months later he started work for a large manufacturer, but became frustrated at the lack of opportunity to do design work. So at a family conference it was decided they
would set up in business for themselves.

FIRST FACTORY

Mr. Catt said, “Our first factory was a converted shop with about 800 square feet to work in. Our first job was to build cupboards and built-in wardrobes, and although we lost money on that job we established a reputation for quality which we have retained ever since.”

From that small start they were able to begin manufacturing Roy’s designs. He said, “We were fortunate that when we began there was a general demand for better furniture. We joined the Guild which is dedicated to raising standards and improving design.

“At the first show we were awarded first prize, and it was rather
embarrassing as we only had the small workshop and could hardly cope with the subsequent orders.”

Since then the family has had two other factories including the present one, which occupies 5,100 square feet at Willeton, an outer Perth suburb. It has showrooms,
offices, a well-ventilated workshop area and an amenities room for the staff.

As a cabinet maker, Charles converts Roy’s designs from the drawing board and makes them into working drawings for the men in the factory. Grace does the office work and the administration, a side of the business she enjoys.

Roy lives at Swanview Terrace, South Perth, which is just around the corner from his mother and father who live at Stanley Flats, Mill Pount Road, South Perth.

The whole family like Australia, and the three children – Roy, Gillian and Graham – are all married to Australians.

See also biography of Charles Catt at Design and Art Online website. According to the Western Australia Museum Welcome Wall website, Charles died in 1979 and Grace in 2002.