Category Archives: Roads

1880 : The funeral of the cricketer Southerton

FUNERAL OF SOUTHERTON

On Monday afternoon the remains of poor James Southerton, the well-known Surrey bowler, were borne to their last place of rest in Mitcham Churchyard, the funeral attracting a large number of persons, who were well acquainted with the sterling qualities of deceased, to the little village green in front of the inn which Southerton tenanted during his life.

The Surrey County Cricket Club was represented by Messre C. W. Alcock, J. Wood, F. Gale, Dr Parrott, E. Garland, G. Wells, C. A. Stein, T. Mossendew, and others. The only one of the county eleven, as now constituted, present was Richard Humphrey, who acted one the pall-bearers, but there were several old players connected with Surrey to show respect to the memory their former comrade, among them J. Swann, W. Shepherd, and W. Mortlock.

The Mitcham Cricket Club, which Southerton was an active member, sent a strong detachment, including Dr Marshall, the president; Messrs Harbor, Compton, Harvey, and about 30 others; and old cricketers unconnected with Surrey, there were also present Edgar Willshier, K. Thoms, T. Mantle, and many others.

Half-past 4 o’€™clock was the hour appointed for departure of the funeral cortege from the house of the deceased, and very soon after that time the procession made a start. The lane dawn which the coffin passed to the parish church was lined throughout with residents of Mitcham, and the churchyard was already well filled before the service over the body had been completed. There could not have been less than 300 round the grave while the last part of the mournful ceremony was taking place, and doubt whether the pretty little burying-ground has ever held a larger gathering or formed the scene of more impressive picture. The following were told off to act as pall-bearers – €”R. Humphrey, R. Knight, E. Willsher, T. Sewell, R. Thome, F. Gale, T. A. Mantle, and F. Harwood. The service was conducted by vicar of Mitcham, the Rev. D. F. Wilson. M.A., and will be some little time before the village so closely identified with Surrey cricket will forget the imposing ceremonial witnessed on the occasion of Southerton’€™s funeral.

A meeting held subsequently at the King€’s Head, Mitcham, to consider the advisability of establishing some memorial in remembrance of Southerton as a cricketer. Dr Marshall, the President of Mitcham CC, was the chair and there were in all about thirty present. It was resolved that a local committee be formed for the purpose of providing some memorial to the late James Southerton, and that the committee should communicate with the committee of Surrey County Club to ascertain its views of the character of such memorial.

Source: Bell’s Life in London and Sporting Chronicle – Saturday 26 June 1880 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1895 Death from pleurisy

MITCHAM.

On Tuesday, Mr Percy Morrison held an inquiry at the Mortuary Chapel, Mitcham, relative to the death of Emily Mills, the wife of Joseph Mills, a builder’s labourer, living at 26, Sibthorp-road.

— The husband stated that the deceased was 40 years age, and since her father’s death, which took place in March last, had not been in good health.

— Dr Oscar Berridge Shelswell deposed that he attended the deceased on the 3rd inst., and found that she was suffering from pains under the heart and slight pleurisy. On the 13th inst. he discovered that she was suffering from pneumonia and pleurisy, to which he attributed her death.

— The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence.

Source: Surrey Mirror – Friday 24 May 1895 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1961 : Eldest of 3 brothers at TW Palmer retires

THE unique service of three brothers to one firm has come to an end—with the retirement of 75-year-old Charlie Sears from T. W. Palmer, constructional engineers, Merton Abbey.

Charlie, senior erection supervisor, joined the firm 61 years ago. But able to keep him in touch with latest developments will be his two brothers who have no thought of retiring yet.

Brother Bill (aged 70), Park Road, Colliers Wood, and brother Frank (aged 72), Wilson Avenue, joined T. W. Palmer soon after Charlie.

Source : Mitcham News & Mercury, 27th January, 1961, page 9.

In the 1901 census, Charles Sears, aged 15, is living with his parents James, 41, and Elizabeth Sears, 42, at no. 3 Blue Houses, Christchurch; with his brothers, Francis, 12, William, 10 and sisters Mary, 4 and Annie 1.

In the 1911 census, he is 25 and living with his wife Clara, also 25, and their son of 2 months Edmund at 7 Stamford Terrace, Feltham Road. His occupation is listed as an Iron Worker in an Iron Foundry.

Walter Mays Ltd.

The Abbey Cork Mills of Walter Mays Ltd was built on the site of William De Morgan’s pottery, Colliers Wood, in around 1890.

1950 OS map

Walter Carden-Mays born December 1865 in Camberwell. He married in 1888 and died on 21st January 1941 in Surrey. The ‘Carden’ part of the family name was dropped at some point, and his company was known as Walter Mays Ltd.

Listed in the 1925 street directory as Walter Mays Ltd. (Abbey Cork Works), 150 & 152 Byegrove Road.

1924 aerial photo. The site for Colliers wood underground station can be seen bottom right. The cork factory is on the left of the High Street.

1934 OS map rotated to show same view as aerial photo above


Ad from Flight Magazine of 1938 :

and directory listing from same:

WALTER MAYS, LTD., Abbey Cork Mills, London, S.W.19 (Liberty 3764).—” Everything in cork “; carburettor and oil indicator floats, gauge glass washers, gland packings, strut sealing corks, anti-vibration mats, composition cork jointing to D.T.D.219A, laminated and plain.

In an entry on Grace’s Guide to British Industrial History from 1939 about suppliers to the aircraft industry, cork joints to specification DTD 219A were widely used for petrol tank gaskets and packings.


The Stone Cottage of the Surrey Iron Railway stood on the Walter Mays Ltd site for over 150 years.


Mitcham Military Service Tribunals

As reported by the Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, 16th June 1916, an employer of a cork business in Colliers Wood, appealed for his son. Although not named, it is likely that the company was Walter Mays Ltd.

Exemption was asked for a skilled mechanic, by the owner of a cork manufacturing business in Colliers Wood. The employer said the man was very valuable in his present employment and he will be practically impossible to replace. A large proportion of their manufacturers were for government uses. He employed about 17 men of whom are only three were eligible. He pleaded that his son was capable of doing almost anything in the business and his departure might cause the closing down of the business.

Three months exemption.

In the Mitcham and Tooting Mercury, 2nd November 1917, the company and employee are named in an appeal.

Mr Walter Mays, cork manufacturer, of the Abbey Cork Works, High Street, Colliers Wood, asked for a exemption for Mr T.W.S. Cavey, age 41, B1, motor driver and mechanic, residing at Birdhurst Road, Colliers Wood.

Applicant: An exemption for so long as the man remained in his employment. He was engaged in delivering all Mr Mays’s important Government contract work. The average mileage was 250 miles a week.

Counc. Baker : I suppose it is all Government work that Mr Mays does?

Applicant: Oh, yes, it is most important.

The appeal was disallowed.

In the 1919 electoral register a Thomas William Sherrin CAVEY was living with his wife Florence Louisa in 28 Birdhurst Road. He died in 1950 as stated on the Find-A-Grave website, which also says he was a Music Hall performer known as Stirling Fred.


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Edward Pullen gets MBE in 1961 but missed DCM in 1916

Local man in the Honours’ List

A MITCHAM First World War hero was made an M.B.E. in the New Year Honours. He is 64-year-old Mr. Edward Charles Pullen, Framfield Road, who will be given the award by the Queen.

He gets it for public service in the Inland Revenue Department — he is a staff officer at Somerset House.

His meeting with the Queen will make up for a disappointment he had in 1916 when he should have received the D.C.M. from King George the Fifth. When the investiture date arrived Mr. Pullen had influenza.

Mr. Pullen said this week: “This rather goes to make up for it”

WOUNDED

He earned the D.C.M. during the Battle of the Somme while serving with the Northamptonshire Regiment. His company was trying to win a German strongpoint at Thiepval.

All the officers were wounded or killed and Mr. Pullen, then a sergeant, took charge. Although himself seriously wounded, he led his men to capture the outpost and held it until they were relieved next day.

Between 1919 and 1929 he played for the Wanderers, forerunners of Tooting and Mitcham United.

Mr. Pullen retires in April when he reaches 65.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1961

His MBE award was published in the London Gazette on 27 December 1960 in supplement 42231, page 8906.

His DCM award was reported in the London Gazette of 24 November 1916 in supplement 29837, page 11559.

13537 E. C. Pullen, North’n R.

For conspicuous gallantry in action.

He assumed command of and led his company with great courage and initiative, capturing an enemy strong point. He was severely wounded.

Harry Frederick Winbow

Mr Harry Frederick Winbow, who knew Mitcham Common when cows grazed on it, died last week the age of 89.

Mr Winbow, Commonide East, Mitcham, is the father of Mr Henry Winbow, chairman of Mitcham Common Preservation Society.

He came to Mitcham in 1900 and bought a house in the Gorringe Park estate , then being developed. In those days the house was surrounded by corn fields

Most of his life he was a maintenance engineer at the Bachelors’ Club in the West End.

Before he retired at the age of 70, he ran the Dorset Inn at Withyham, Sussex, for five years. During the First World War he served in the Royal Flying Corps.

Mr Henry Winbow said this week: “Many people knew him in Mitcham, especially the traders at Fair Green. He used to do the shopping for us.”

He leaves a widow, Agnes Louise (aged 92), two sons, Henry and Arthur, and a daughter, Maud.

Source: Mitcham News and Mercury, 13th January, 1961.


Harry Frederick Winbow in the 1911 England Census
Name: Harry Frederick Winbow
Age in 1911: 39
Estimated birth year: abt 1872
Relation to Head: Head
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Westminster, London, England
Civil Parish: Mitcham
County/Island: Surrey
Country: England
Street address: Kendrick, Commonside East, Mitcham, Surrey
Marital Status: Married
Occupation: Electrical Engineer In Club
Registration district: Croydon
Registration District Number: 39
Sub-registration district: Mitcham
ED, institution, or vessel: 14
Household schedule number: 33
Piece: 3434

Household Members:
Name Age
Harry Frederick Winbow 39
Agnes Louise Winbow 41
Henry Francis George Winbow 16
Constance Elizabeth Winbow 15
Maud Mary Louise Winbow 13
Arthur Stanley Buckler Winbow 3
William Holmes 84
Dorothy Beatrice Holmes 19

Source Citation
Class: RG14; Piece: 3434; Schedule Number: 33
Source Information
Ancestry.com. 1911 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911.

Veteran Car : Benz Ideal 4.5 hp reg P3518

Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th November 1959.

The car is shown on the forecourt of Allen Bros garage, of which Mr Manning was a director.

This car was bought by Mr F.E. Manning, Mitcham Park, in the mid 1950s. It had a fairly good engine, which he stripped down and rebuilt. He and his son worked on rebuilding the rest of the car. They took drawings from another Benz and made components as near as possible to the original. This photo from 1957 on Merton Memories shows them working on the car.

They entered the London to Brighton Veteran Car Rally in 1957, as shown in this Merton Memories photo.

In this article from 1959, his son didn’t go with him on the rally.

Veteran run

For the third year running Mr F.E. Manning has driven his 1900 Benz over the finishing line in the annual veteran car run to Brighton. And this year he got back to his home in Mitcham Park in time to see himself on the television newsreel.

Although breaking no records for the run, Mr Manning bowled along merrily in his black and primrose car (with solid tyres), crossing the finishing line at 2.30 p.m. with plenty of time to spare.

“Traffic was very heavy,” Mr Manning told me, “so we could not record any spectacular time. But we only stopped once en route and that was for lunch, The car behave perfectly all the way.”

Mr Manning’s 17-year-old son Butch did not go with him this year. “I think he got fed up with getting soaked through on the two previous runs. But we were very lucky as the weather was good this year,” Mr Manning added.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury 6th November, 1959

Restored again in 2006/7 the car was sold at Bonhams auction in February 2017 for around £105,000.