Category Archives: Places

1906 Death of Mr Hatfeild at Morden Hall

DEATH OF MR HATFEILD AT MORDEN HALL

On Saturday last there died at his residence Morden Hall, Merton, at the age of 79, one of the best known men in the tobacco world, Mr Gilliat Hatfeild.

Mr Hatfeild, who was reputed a millionaire, was senior partner in the famous old firm all Taddy and Co., Minories, whose establishment dates as far back as 1730.

The firm of Taddy has been closely associated with the snuff trade. Snuff was its staple product. Although of late years this has ceased to make the old appeal to the public taste, “Taddy’s” “Tom Buck” “Black Rappee” and “Brown Rappee” are well known to and largely affected by snuff takers.

Attached to the fine park which Morden Hall stands are snuff mills. Hither the raw material is brought from London, manufactured, and carted back in its manufactured state to town. It is doubtful whether large fortunes are to be made in the snuff trade now, but more recently thhere is said to have been a certain revival of the snuff habit.

Mr Hatfeild’s funeral Took place on Wednesday at Kensal Green Cemetery at ten minutes to two.

One of the deceased’s daughters is a well-known dog fancier, and another daughter it will be remembered is the wife of Mr T.A. Meates, formerly chairman of the Wimbledon Bench of magistrates.

Source: Wimbledon Boro’ News, 17th February, 1906

His son, Gilliat Edward Hatfeild, refused to sell his estate to property developers. He died in 1941 and left Morden Hall Park to the National Trust.

Queen Anne’s Bounty

To help with the income of poor clergy, the Queen Anne’s Bounty was a sum of money used to buy land. This land was then rented out and this rental income was used to support the clergy.

In 1734, £200 of this Royal Bounty was used to buy an area of land from Charles Dubois in Mitcham, to support the vicar at the parish church.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Source: An Account of the Augmentation of Small Livings by “The Governors of the Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of the Maintenance of the poor Clergy” published in 1856, by Christoper Hodgson, M.A.

Eric Montague, in his Mitcham Histories : 12 Church Street and Whitford Lane, page 107, said that more land was bought in 1762 from Mary Gellibrand.

This OS map of 1867 shows areas marked as ‘Glebe’. Note that the London Road was, as shown on this map, known as Whitford Lane.

1867 OS map

1867 OS map

Later, parts of this land was sold off to developers to build houses. Montague, page 108, ibid., said that in 1790 a substantial plot was sold to build a house cwhich became Glebelands.

In the Land Registry title for a house in Preshaw Crescent for example, a conveyance was made in 1897:

A Conveyance of the land in this title and other land dated 2 September 1897 made between (1) The Reverend Frederick Wilson Clerk (the Incumbent) (2) The Governors of The Bounty of Queen Anne for the Augmentation of The Maintenance of The Poor Clergy (the Governors) (3) The Right Reverend Father in God Edward Stuart (the Ordinary) (4) Francis Charles Simpson (the Patron) (5) The Right Honourable and Most Reverend Frederick By Divine Providence Lord Archbishop of Canterbury (the Archbishop) and (6) Richard Arthur Bush (the Purchaser) contains covenants details of which are set out in the schedule of restrictive covenants hereto.

See also Queen Anne’s Bounty on wikipedia.

1952 : A Park in his Care

From the Mitcham Advertiser, 2nd October, 1952, page 5.

A familiar figure in Mitcham is Mr George Finch, for 26 years in the employ of the the council and now gardener and charge-hand at Tamworth Farm recreation ground.

His first job with the council – there was no separate parks department in those days – was “mowing Figges Marsh.” After that he became a driver and remained at that job until about three years ago.

He joined the council in 1926, a week after his discharge from the Army.

Mr Finch, who comes from an old Mitcham family, was born in Phipps Bridge Road. As a youth of 17, he ran away from home to join the Army, but at the recruiting centre he was told he was under age. A few days later he went back to the recruiting officer and told him he was 18.

“Haven’t you been here before?” he was asked. “Never,” replied Mr Finch. He was accepted and served until 1926.

Mr Finch, who is 50, joined the council’s service a week after his discharge from the Army. He lives in Sibthorp Road.

Robin Ltd., Incandescent Gas Mantle Makers, Lonesome

1910 OS Map

1910 OS Map

The company experienced a boom in its business of making and selling incandescent gas mantles during World War 1. Gas mantles, the part of a gas lamp that glows, were made from Thorium, which was extracted from sands mined in Brazil. Before the war, Germany was the only country that produced Thorium from these sands, as pointed out in a letter to the Daily Express. With the war, imports from Germany ceased, and Thorium had to be bought from the US.

Robin Ltd. stated in a military service tribunal of 11th August 1916 that:

owing to the import of German mantles being stopped since the war their business had increased enormously, and they now employed 500 hands.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Barclays Bank, Fair Green

The Barclays Bank that opened at 6 Fair Green Parade was a sub-branch of the branch on the corner of 342 London Road and Lower Green West.

It possibly opened in 1958 as the telephone directory of that year lists the number as MITcham 7730. Fair Green Parade was built around 1953.

6 Fair Green Parade. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

6 Fair Green Parade. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

Interior of 6 Fair Green Parade. Courtesy of Barclays Group Archives.

Interior of 6 Fair Green Parade. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives.

This branch moved in 1973 to a new building on the corner of Montrose Gardens, see newspaper article below.

29/31 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

29/31 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

39/41 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

39/41 Upper Green East. Photo courtesy of Barclays Group Archives

BANK’S NEW OFFICES TO OPEN SOON

STAFF at Mitcham’s branch of Barclays Bank are soon to move into their new offices at Upper Green East.

And, promises manager Mr James Crocker, banking will be a lot pleasanter for both customers and staff than at the present cramped quarters in Fair Green-parade.

“We are hoping to move some time in mid-April and the new building on the other side of Fair Green will be much bigger, with six tills and a carpeted banking hall.” he said.

There will be an upstairs rest room and more toilet facilities for the staff.

The branch was a sub branch of the Barclays branch at Cricket Green when it opened several years ago.

“It was decided to make it a full branch as business has expanded a great deal in Mitcham,” said Mr Crocket. “Also we have to consider that a new supermarket is opening and probably more shops with the new central redevelopment.”

The staff of eleven at the present branch were working in very cramped conditions he added. “Now, with so much more room we will be having more staff.”

Source: Mitcham & Collier’s wood Gazette, 31st January 1973

1919 plan for Park Place by the YMCA

A letter from the YMCA to the Mitcham & Tooting Mercury in 1919 sets out their plan for Park Place.

THE MITCHAM PARK PLACE SCHEME.

To the Editor of “ The Mercury.”

Sir,

The following is a rough outline of the scheme which we hope to carry out at Park Place.

Park Place and grounds is a very large house, standing in about eleven acres of ground. There are two large meadows, a tennis court, lawns, part of which will be used as a bowling green, a large garden and orchard. In the main part of the building there are five rooms upstairs, which we hope to run as a hostel for about ten men and there is also a large room which will be used as a games room. Downstairs we have arranged for a restaurant, ’billiard room and a music room and library, and a private room for the exclusive and permanent use of the secretary of the National Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers. To satisfy the one need of a large hall for concerts, lectures and other activities, we hope to transfer the hut in the hospital to these grounds as soon as it is not required at the hospital.

We are planning to carry out a very extensive social and sports programme, and we hope to form cricket, football, tennis, bowling, quoits and boxing clubs, to hold frequent sports meetings and to arrange billiard tournaments and to organise whist drives. We expect to be able to carry out an educational programme by arranging lectures and classes and study circles and by running a library. On Saturday afternoons and evenings in the summer, we shall try to arrange al fresco teas and concerts on the lawn, and on Sunday afternoons it is my hope that, in co-operation with the religious denominations in Mitcham, we shall be able to arrange for some sort of united religious service.

As the Mitcham Golf Course is so near we may find it possible to form a golf club. In addition to those activities, which we can arrange for ourselves, I am sure it will be possible for us to secure well-known concert parties, lecturers and demonstrations in all kinds of sport by well-known amateurs and professionals.

There will be an advisory committee formed from the members of the club and then I hope that we shall be able to form a ladies’ auxiliary committee. Mrs. Cato Worsfold, whose splendid work in connection with the hospital hut, is well known, has kindly consented to be president of this committee, and Miss Holden will be the secretary. This committee will be responsible for recruiting and organising ladies’ voluntary assistance. While on this question, I would like to throw out a strong appeal to the gentlemen of the district to associate themselves with the club and to assist us in every possible way to form the various sports clubs.

Such is the bare outline of the different activities, which we hope to carry out here. A thousand other things suggest themselves. My own feeling is that here we have a magnificent opportunity to build up a strong social and sports club, which will be the very centre of social activities in Mitcham, and in regard to sport, an organisation which can become a real power house in the realm of amateur athletics. Now, this can only lie done by utilising every ounce of local support. We must all pull the same way with the same ideals. There is no resident in Mitcham who cannot contribute in service and subscription (I put service first).

Now a word as to membership. All men over the age of sixteen years will be admitted to the buildings and grounds free. Perhaps, I may put in a word here on the position of the Mitcham branch of the Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers Federation. For the permanent and exclusive use as an office and committee room of the federation, one of the rooms downstairs has been set aside. For the ordinary activities of the scheme, members of the Federation will become members of the Red Triangle Club. The federation will be allowed the exclusive use, not more than twice a week, of one or more of the large rooms for the purposes of general meetings, Federation whist drives, small concerts, etc. The whole catering arrangements will always be in the hands of the Y.M.C.A.

Every man wishing to use the club will be given a membership ticket which will entitle him to one month’s free membership. At the expiration of this period this card may be renewed to extend over a period not exceeding twelve months. My idea is that if it proves financially possible to do so, we should endeavour to put these clubs on the same basis as the Y.M.C.A. huts. They should be open to all men at all times free of charge. Later on it may be necessary — indeed the numbers themselves may require it — for us to charge a small membership fee. The different sports clubs will, of course, have their own membership fees. This will be fixed by the members of the clubs themselves. The only regulations enforced in regard to the formation of these clubs will be those applying to the particular kind of sport and a very strict rule prohibiting any form of gambling.

Now, a word as to the admission of ladies. We would like very much to carry out a joint work for both sexes, but unfortunately our space will not permit this at the moment. I think that we can and should arrange for the ladies to join our sports clubs, especially the tennis club, and that the members of the club should be encouraged to bring their wives and lady friends to the concerts, whist drives, and the Saturday afternoon al fresco concerts and teas.

Men and women have grown to love healthy club life and if every spare shilling and every spare hour were spent in the establishment of these clubs, I am convinced that a great many of our social problems would disappear. Men and women to-day are waiting for the opportunity to serve their fellows as much as to be served.

As to the opening. The formal opening has been arranged to take place on Saturday, the 10th May. at 5.15 p.m. Dr. T. Cato Worsfold, M.P., has kindly consented to occupy the chair on this occasion. Sir Arthur K. Yapp, K.B.E., will speak on the after-war programme of the Y.M.C.A. It is hoped to secure the presence of a well known personage. On the 10th May the house and grounds will be thrown open to the public from 2.30 p.m., and teas will be served in the grounds from 3.30 p.m. at popular prices. As this will be the occasion of the formal entry of the Mitcham Branch of the National Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Soldiers, a demonstration will be made by ex-service men before the opening ceremony. The Secretary and members of the local branch are busy arranging a procession which will march round Mitcham headed by bands. The Y.M.C.A. extends to everyone a hearty invitation to attend this important function.

I am, yours sincerely,
Thos. B. Scotcher.
Resident Secretary.

Park Place,
Mitcham.

Source: Mitcham & Tooring Mercury, 2nd May, 1919 page 5