Category Archives: People

1852 : Mr Ashby, miller

Mentioned in a case about the theft of sacks.

WANDSWORTH.
— SACK STEALING.

— At the Police Court on Saturday, James Bennett, marine store-dealer, Garrett-lane, Tooting, apprehended by police-serjeant R. Whittle, V division, was charged with having in his possession three sacks, the property of Mr. B. L. Charrington miller, of Carshalton, Messrs. Hall and Davidson, and Mr. Ashby, miller, of Mitcham. The parties belonging to the Sack Protection Society.

Mr. Turpin, the officer to the society, attended to prosecute. The sacks were identified, and defendant was fined 10s. for each, and expenses, and in default of payment was committed by T. Painter, Esq. for one month.

Source: The South Eastern Gazette, 26th October, 1852

1942 : A former noted show-woman buried in Mitcham

DEATH OF MRS. AMY NORMAN
A FORMER NOTED SHOWWOMAN

ONE of the most interesting characters in the show world, MrsAmy Norman, mother of Mr. Tom Norman, who for fourteen years ran a “Housey-Housey” booth in Rugby, died at Rugby Emergency Hospital Wednesday night. She had been ill a fortnight, and was taken to the hospital on Sunday.

Born in a caravan at Loughborough in 1880, Mrs. Norman was the daughter of Mr. Jim Rayner, a famous showman, who owned a mumming booth in which a different play was performed each night. It was here that Mrs. Norman began her career, playing in such melodramas as “Maria Martin,” and she also played in Shakespearean plays and was a wonderful dancer.

When she was fifteen she married the late Mr. Tom Norman, who was known as the “Silver King” and the showman’s auctioneer. She lived all her life in a caravan, and most of her six sons and three daughters, all of whom, with the exception of one daughter, were in the show business before the war, were born a caravan. Since her eldest son, Mr. Tom Norman, left Rugby about five years ago she has been living with some of her family in a caravan in Mr. Durham’s yard in West Leyes. A short time ago Mr. Norman was asked to prepare a script and invite his mother to broadcast some of her reminiscences.

The funeral will take place Monday at Mitcham, Surrey, where Mrs. Norman’s husband is buried in the family grave.

Source: Rugby Advertiser – Friday 05 June 1942 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Arthur Edmund Hayne

During World War 1, Arthur Hayne’s photographers shop in Tooting offered free portrait photos to recruits.

His obituary from the Mitcham and Colliers Wood Gazette 8th May 1959 :

Death of Mr. Arthur Hayne
Former Well-Known Tooting Personality

We regret to record the death of Mr. Arthur Hayne of Carshalton Park Road, Carshalton. A former Tootingite, Mr. Hayne who was 91 years of age was actively associated with politics all his life.

He was well known 50 years ago as an open air speaker at Tooting Broadway for the Anti-Socialist Union, and he also addressed meetings at Mitcham Fair Green.

The Three Brothers

Born at Croydon, Mr. Hayne came to Tooting at the age of eight with his brothers James and Charles, and was connected with them in business at Tooting Broadway in the early part of the century. Arthur had a photographers shop, and James was a well-known Tooting news agent while Charles sold the papers outside a kiosk near the Tooting Baths.

Mr. Arthur Hayne did not take an active part in the political life of Tooting. He went to school at the church schools in Church Lane and later at Tooting Graveney Schools and was a member of the Tooting Parish Church choir in his younger days.

He moved to Mitcham some years ago and become chairman of the Mitcham Conservative Association. A staunch Conservative Mr. Hayne was well-known as a public speaker for the Conservative cause to which he devoted much of his spare time up to a few years ago. During the First World War he was a special constable.

When he moved to Carshalton he joined the Carshalton and Banstead Conservative Association and become vice chairman. Until a few months ago Mr. Hayne who was in business in London as a merchant was still working. He leaves a wife (formerly Miss Attlee of Tooting), two sons and two daughters.

The funeral was at Carshalton Parish Church.

In 1914, A. E. Hayne is listed in company 1 of the Mitcham Town Guard.

In the 1915 street directory, he was living at St. Cross, Graham Road, where he was also listed as the secretary of the Mitcham Conservative & Unionist Association.

1931 : the last agricultural worker in Mitcham

Charles William Blackburn, the last agricultural labourer left in Mitcham, died, aged eighty-nine. For over fifty years he worked at Sherwood Farm, on the edge of Mitcham Common. The farm is now covered with streets of new houses.

Source: Illustrated Police News – Thursday 15 October 1931 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1961 : Eldest of 3 brothers at TW Palmer retires

THE unique service of three brothers to one firm has come to an end—with the retirement of 75-year-old Charlie Sears from T. W. Palmer, constructional engineers, Merton Abbey.

Charlie, senior erection supervisor, joined the firm 61 years ago. But able to keep him in touch with latest developments will be his two brothers who have no thought of retiring yet.

Brother Bill (aged 70), Park Road, Colliers Wood, and brother Frank (aged 72), Wilson Avenue, joined T. W. Palmer soon after Charlie.

Source : Mitcham News & Mercury, 27th January, 1961, page 9.

In the 1901 census, Charles Sears, aged 15, is living with his parents James, 41, and Elizabeth Sears, 42, at no. 3 Blue Houses, Christchurch; with his brothers, Francis, 12, William, 10 and sisters Mary, 4 and Annie 1.

In the 1911 census, he is 25 and living with his wife Clara, also 25, and their son of 2 months Edmund at 7 Stamford Terrace, Feltham Road. His occupation is listed as an Iron Worker in an Iron Foundry.

Edward Pullen gets MBE in 1961 but missed DCM in 1916

Local man in the Honours’ List

A MITCHAM First World War hero was made an M.B.E. in the New Year Honours. He is 64-year-old Mr. Edward Charles Pullen, Framfield Road, who will be given the award by the Queen.

He gets it for public service in the Inland Revenue Department — he is a staff officer at Somerset House.

His meeting with the Queen will make up for a disappointment he had in 1916 when he should have received the D.C.M. from King George the Fifth. When the investiture date arrived Mr. Pullen had influenza.

Mr. Pullen said this week: “This rather goes to make up for it”

WOUNDED

He earned the D.C.M. during the Battle of the Somme while serving with the Northamptonshire Regiment. His company was trying to win a German strongpoint at Thiepval.

All the officers were wounded or killed and Mr. Pullen, then a sergeant, took charge. Although himself seriously wounded, he led his men to capture the outpost and held it until they were relieved next day.

Between 1919 and 1929 he played for the Wanderers, forerunners of Tooting and Mitcham United.

Mr. Pullen retires in April when he reaches 65.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 6th January, 1961

His MBE award was published in the London Gazette on 27 December 1960 in supplement 42231, page 8906.

His DCM award was reported in the London Gazette of 24 November 1916 in supplement 29837, page 11559.

13537 E. C. Pullen, North’n R.

For conspicuous gallantry in action.

He assumed command of and led his company with great courage and initiative, capturing an enemy strong point. He was severely wounded.

Harry Frederick Winbow

Mr Harry Frederick Winbow, who knew Mitcham Common when cows grazed on it, died last week the age of 89.

Mr Winbow, Commonide East, Mitcham, is the father of Mr Henry Winbow, chairman of Mitcham Common Preservation Society.

He came to Mitcham in 1900 and bought a house in the Gorringe Park estate , then being developed. In those days the house was surrounded by corn fields

Most of his life he was a maintenance engineer at the Bachelors’ Club in the West End.

Before he retired at the age of 70, he ran the Dorset Inn at Withyham, Sussex, for five years. During the First World War he served in the Royal Flying Corps.

Mr Henry Winbow said this week: “Many people knew him in Mitcham, especially the traders at Fair Green. He used to do the shopping for us.”

He leaves a widow, Agnes Louise (aged 92), two sons, Henry and Arthur, and a daughter, Maud.

Source: Mitcham News and Mercury, 13th January, 1961.


Harry Frederick Winbow in the 1911 England Census
Name: Harry Frederick Winbow
Age in 1911: 39
Estimated birth year: abt 1872
Relation to Head: Head
Gender: Male
Birth Place: Westminster, London, England
Civil Parish: Mitcham
County/Island: Surrey
Country: England
Street address: Kendrick, Commonside East, Mitcham, Surrey
Marital Status: Married
Occupation: Electrical Engineer In Club
Registration district: Croydon
Registration District Number: 39
Sub-registration district: Mitcham
ED, institution, or vessel: 14
Household schedule number: 33
Piece: 3434

Household Members:
Name Age
Harry Frederick Winbow 39
Agnes Louise Winbow 41
Henry Francis George Winbow 16
Constance Elizabeth Winbow 15
Maud Mary Louise Winbow 13
Arthur Stanley Buckler Winbow 3
William Holmes 84
Dorothy Beatrice Holmes 19

Source Citation
Class: RG14; Piece: 3434; Schedule Number: 33
Source Information
Ancestry.com. 1911 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.
Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA), 1911.