Category Archives: Commerce

1968 : Turner’s Bakery horse Lizzie retires

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 20th September, 1968

After over 25 years as a bakery carthorse, Lizzie has moved from the noisy London suburbs to the peace of a country farm.

Lizzie, a liver chestnut Welsh cob who has reached the
distinguished age of 30, has worked for the past 15 years for Turner’s (Mitcham) Bakery, Fair Green, believed to be the only bakery in London which still uses horse-drawn vans for its delivery rounds.

For those 15 years she has been delivering bread in the Pollards Hill area with her driver Mr. Ted Gibson. Lizzie and Ted were a well-established team as they worked together for J. A. Taylor Ltd of Tooting for 10 years before going to Turner’s.

Life for Lizzie has not all been hard work, however. At the Easter Monday Horse Show in Regents Park she won first prize in the van parade and the Welsh rosette for the best Welsh Cob in the show.

Lizzie’s working day lasted about nine hours and she could make up to 450 calls a day. Anybody who maintains the horse is an outdated and uneconomical means of transportation is challenged by Turners who have proved that if a horse is ill the round takes over an hour longer to operate with a petrol vehicle.

Lizzie went into retirement yesterday (September 19) to Cherry Tree Farm, Lingfield, where she will mix with company from ex-race horses to costers’ donkeys.

Her successor, aptly named Lizzie II, is a nine-year-old bay Welsh Cob who will join Sally, Dolley and Kitty in maintaining Turner’s tradition of horse-drawn vans.

Rising costs led to Turner’s Bakery stopping using horses in 1973.

Advertisements

Eddown & Co.

Was at 190 London Road, Mitcham CR4 3LD, on the west side and north of junction with Bond Road. Motor parts, engineers tools and accessories shop.

As of January 2018 the building still displays the name Eddown but was sold in possibly 2013/4, with the owners moving to the south coast.

This Google StreetView from 2012 shows the shop with its For Sale sign.

A local motor dealer commented on the Mitcham History group on Facebook:

always a great service and nothing was ever too much trouble. No have to use another car parts company and fifty per cent of the time the parts are wrong

A receipt from 1981

Receipt from March 1981

Planning application 17/P3987 registered in November 2017 for

demolition of existing part one and part two storey building and development of two detached blocks comprising 9 residential units and 1 commercial unit


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Connect House

Office building, 21 Willow Lane, Mitcham, CR4 4FL.

Bought on 29th January 2015 for £3,100,000 by CONNECT HOUSE LTD (Co. Regn. No. 9296558) of Unit 9, Ravensdale Industrial Estate, Timberwharf Road, London N16 6DB. Source: Land Registry, title number TGL100496, obtained November 2017.

The land was used to grow watercress by Gaston DUTRIEZ, who bought the property from William Francis Joseph SIMPSON in 1922. Source: Land Registry title and 1930 Commercial directory.

In 2012, Google Street View shows the building as Connect House Serviced Offices, by a company called Frendcastle. On 8th November 2017, BBC London reported that the building was being used by four local councils as temporary housing, with rooms costing between £30 and £40 per night. A Royal Mail postcode search for the address shows 84 flats.

2016 Street View

2012 Street View

1938 OS map


Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Leonard Davey and Hart

Estate agents that were at 17/19 Upper Green East from around 1938 to 1990s?
The firm was listed in the 1971 telephone directory as 01-648 6101.

A planning application from 2001, number 01/2690, submitted by Ladbrokes Ltd show it had become a betting shop:

erection of ground floor rear extension, new shop front, disabled access, 2 air conditioning units, satellite dish and railings at rear of building.

In 1984, estate agency Dixon Hind & Company submitted a planning application, number MER1149/84, for an illuminated sign at 19 Upper Green East. On Merton Memories there is a photo dated c.1987 which shows that estate agent Dixon Hind was the occupant, whose sign said ‘in association with Leonard Davey & Hart’.

Clip from Merton Memories photo reference Mit_​11_​1-50, copyright London Borough of Merton.

ad from 1938

Text of ad:

Mitcham and District

Leonard
Davey & Hart

Herbert E. Hart, P.A.S.I
Leslie O. Hart, B.Sc., P.A.S.I, A.A.I.

Chartered Surveyors, Auctioneers
House, Land and Estate Agents

Rents collected. Mortgagaes
arranged.
Valuations for all purposes.

UPPER GREEN, MITCHAM
And at 781 London Rd., Thornton Heath
telephone : MITcham 0808 THOrnton Heath 1361

According to the 1938 Official Guide to Mitcham, the firms was established around 1903:

Messrs. Leonard Davey & Hart, Chartered Surveyors, Auctioneers, Estate Agents, of Upper Green, Mitcham, have been established for about thirty-five years. The firm was founded by Mr Leonard T. Davey and originally had its offices in the Parade, London Road, moving to its present address nearly twenty years ago.

During the years immediately following the war, when there was much building development in the district, Messrs Leonard Davey & Hart were appointed agents for several of the new estates then laid out. It is perhaps a matter of interest that they acted on behalf of the owners from whom the London County Council purchased the first section of land to the south of Mitcham, since developed as the St Helier Estate.

The business to-day is conducted by Mr H.E. Hart, P.A.S.I., and his son, Mr L.O. Hart, B.Sc., P.A.S.I, A.A.I., who joined him shortly after the retirement of Mr Davey in 1928. The firm’s premises at Upper Green, Mitcham, have recently been rebuilt at considerable expense, and form one of the most modern and well-equipped offices in the district.

Many Mitcham properties including the well-known Ravensbury Manor House, have passed through the hands of this firm and it is not surprising that they, as the oldest firm of Auctioneers in the district, should have an extensive register of properties for sale and to be let.

Apart from this, they have an increasing business in rent collection and Estate management, the properties under their control being situated not only throughout the Borough, but in many surrounding districts. Among those for whom they conduct surveys and valuations are certain Banks and Building Societies, besides private Clients; but the principals seek to give the same personal attention to all who consult them on the varied matters which come within their professional expertise.


News Articles

A COSY COTTAGE CLAIM.

James Henry Scurr, an ironmonger, of 170, Lambeth-walk, London, brought a claim against George Samuel McDo??ugh, of 17, Langdale-avenue, Mitcham, for £13 rent.

There was a counterclaim for £10 10s. for damages due to trespass.

Mr. W. Hood appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. C .E. Graveley for defendant.

Plaintiff said that defendant was the tenant of Cosy Cottage, Whitford-gardens, Mitcham. He had it on a three years lease. Early this year the defendant said that he wished to be relieved of the tenancy. Witness did not object to this providing that defendant found a suitable tenant. He had never found a tenant, and still had the key. He borrowed the key and inspected the premises, after which he had the door varnished and a plate. “Cosy Cottage,” put on the house, in order to facilitate the letting.

Cross-examined defendant objected to the house being changed to “Cosy Cottage.” He preferred – Cosy Lodge. Witness got the key on May 28th. Mr. Davey did not point out to witness that he was not entitled to the premises. He did not know who removed the announcement pointing out that defendant had moved. Witness thought that he had a right to enter, as there was a clause in the agreement to that effect. Defendant had never had a copy of the tenancy agreement. By Mr. Hood—Mr. Davey was never witness’s agent. Witness bought the property when defendant was the existing tenant. He never touched any rubbish on the premises. Defendant said that he took the house in June, 1906, when it was quite new. He removed to Langdale-avenue in March, and when plaintiff suggested the change witness objected, and also sent a letter to that effect. Witness put up a notice that he was moving, as he had a lot of people calling on him. When he moved he gave the key to Mr. Davey, and asked bum to find a tenant. Later witness found that the notice was gone, and that the door had been varnished. He left some frames, vases, tools, and other articles in the house, and he found they were gone. Plaintiff said that he saw defendant about the door, and plaintiff said that he would release defendant of the un-expired time if he informed Mr. Davey to give up the key. Witness asked him to write him to this effect, but plaintiff did not do so.

Cross-examined he did not think he should pay the July quarter, as plaintiff had practically taken possession. He could have let the house.

Leonard Thomas Davey, an estate agent, said that plaintiff’s daughter called for the key on May 27th. No reason was given why the key was wanted. He had numerous enquiries respecting the house until defendant said that he was not responsible for the rent.

Harry Frank Joynes, who had done jobbing work for the plaintiff, deposed to varnishing the door for the plaintiff. He saw the notice in the window to the effect that defendant had moved.

Mr. Graveley submitted that damage had been done by the premises being thrown open, and the articles were thus lust, and the notice removed. His Honor gave judgment for plaintiff on the claim and counterclaim.

Source: Croydon Guardian and Surrey County Gazette – Saturday 15 August 1908 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

1926 auction of Mrs Lipshytz property at Mitcham Park.


A member of the Facebook Mitcham History Group remembers Mrs & Mrs Hart when he was a child in the 1960s. They lived next door, in Preshaw Crescent, and was also their landlord. He said:

They were a lovely couple of real gentlefolk of the old school. She was one of the Sunday School teachers in the parish rooms, across the green, and he owned and ran Hart’s estate agency, with the office at the Fair Green (next door to the Nat West Bank, or thereabouts). He always wore a trilby hat, and would doff it whenever he passed a lady.


ad from 1925

1936/7 Nalder & Collyer’s sale to Ind Coope

Brewery Distribution

An unusual linking of brewery interest is brought to notice by an announcement to-day from Nalder & Collyer’s Brewery Co. (Ltd.) This Company has a capital of £660,000 in £130,000 Ordinary and £530,000 Preference shares. Practically all the Ordinary and 90 per cent, of the Preference are held by the City of London Brewery and Investment Trust (Ltd.) This latter, now mainly an investment trust, has a considerable holding in Ind Coope & Allsopp (Ltd.) and also an indirect interest in Ind Coope through Nalder & Collyer, which in March last year sold a number of its properties to Ind Coope & Allsopp (Ltd.) for a total consideration of £2,200,353, paid partly in cash and partly in Ind Coope Debentures, Preference, and Ordinary stocks.

The directors of Nalder & Collyer are now going to distribute part of the Ind Coope Ordinary to the Company’s Ordinary shareholders and the bulk of these shares will of course go to the City of London Brewery and Investment Trust (Ltd.) For every £10 Nalder & Collyer Ordinary will be given £2 of Ind Coope Ordinary, making the total distribution £26,000 nominal, worth at the current market price £162,500. Accompanying this announcement is a final dividend of 20 per cent plus a 10 per cent cash bonus, making, with the interim of 25 per cent., a total of 55 per cent, as before, which of course also goes mainly to the controlling company. There is a free market in City of London Brewery 5s Deferred Ordinary units now standing around 20s. a price which indicates long-standing hopes of a capital bonus. Last year’s dividend was only 6 per cent. The next accounts are to June 30 next and are due in July.

Source: The Scotsman – Friday 07 May 1937 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Nalder & Collyer owned the Horse and Groom, Kings Head (later Burn Bullock), Ravensbury Arms, Three Kings, Swan, Windmill.

Universal Tractors Ltd.

TRACTORS FROM RUMANIA.

Universal Tractors Ltd., of Mitcham, are to market the Rumanian Universal UTB line of tractors in the UK. Although Universal manufacture a line of five tractors from 45 to 73 hp, to start with only the U651, the 73 hp SAE four-wheel drive model, is being offered in this country at a price of £1,320. At a price claimed to be £700 cheaper than its nearest competitor on the market, Universal say that it offers remarkable value to the British farmer looking for a larger tractor.

Full details from Universal Tractors Ltd., 323 London Road, Mitcham, Surrey.

Source: Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News – Saturday 01 November 1969 from the British Newspaper Archive (subscription required)

Mitcham Directories

Street directories are useful for finding where something was as the street is described as if you were walking down it. Trade and commercial directories give alphabetical lists of businesses.