Category Archives: Buildings

St Marks Church Vicarage House

Vicarage for St Marks church, on the corner of Carew Road and Locks Lane,
although address is Locks Lane, CR4 2JX.

1952 os map

Planning application number 1586 was submitted by the Diocese of Southwark to build a vicarage in Carew Road. Source: Mitcham UDC minutes, page 196, volume XV, 1929-1930.


Progress is being made with regard to the building of the Vicarage House for St. Mark’s Church, Mitcham. The Ecclesiastical Commissioners have £2,404 in hand for this purpose, and £40 17s. 5d. lies in Barclay’s Bank.

In order to meet expenses, £2,000 is required. Mr. Stanley Dale, of Mitcham, has been selected as the building contractor. The plans of the Vicarage House are at present with the Ecclesiastical Commissioners for their final approval.

Source: Mitcham News & Mercury, 12th July, 1929, page 1.

The website for St Marks church gives the vicars address here.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.


Glendene, Love Lane

Possibly the earlier name for number 77 Love Lane CR4 3AW, in use before that road was renumbered.

In 1935 George Victor Dearn, of 77 Love Lane, registered the land that was to become Dearn Gardens. In 1929, planning application number 1515 was submitted by G.V. Dearn of “Glendene”, Love Lane, to build a WC and shed. The assumption then is that these two people are the same and that he didn’t move between 1929 and 1935.

Source: page 20, volume XV of Mitcham Urban District Council minutes, 1929-1930.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Urban District Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

Baltic Close and Oslo Court

Road and block of flats off northern side of Colliers Wood High Street and built in 1938/9 by Mercer Taylor & Co. At this time the Mitcham borough boundary included this road. Royal Mail postcode lookup shows 16 flats, all with the postcode SW19 2BL.

1950 OS map

The developer wrote to Mitcham Borough Council and suggested that since this road was next to the Victory pub, then the name of the road could be Trafalgar Close or Victory Close. The council disagreed, pointing out there were already similar named roads in the SW19 postal district. The council suggested Baltic Close, and the developer agreed, who suggested that the block of flats be named Oslo Court.

Source: Minutes of the Mitcham Borough Council, 1938-39 volume 5, pages 12 and 127.

Note that the Victory pub has since been renamed a couple of times, and the current (as of Feb 2018) name is the Charles Holden, who was an architect who designed the nearby Colliers Wood underground station.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.

Minutes of meetings held by the Mitcham Borough Council are available on request from the Merton Heritage and Local Studies Centre at Morden Library.

St. Mark’s Church building

St Marks Church and church room

1910 OS map

According to Eric Montague, in his Mitcham Histories: 7 The Upper or Fair Green, page 111:

the church was designed by Robert Masters Chart in a style of approximately 13th century … built by Stewart and Sons of Croydon

Dates (also from Montague)
February 1898 – foundation stone laid
1899 – nave and aisles finished
January 1901 – consecrated
1910 – chancel, north transept and south chapel added

The district of St Mark, which covered most of the electoral east ward, was previously part of the parish of SS Peter & Paul, Church Road. It became its own parish in 1905.

It is part of the diocese of Southwark, whose website says:

The church is built of soft red brick with Bath stone dressings and red/orange machine-made, plain clay tiles. There is a copper covered fleche with bell.

The copper at the base of the pointed spire (or ‘fleche’) has become green due to weathering.

Why Mrs Wood was last to leave Majestic Cinema

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 1st December, 1961

PROJECTORS whirred to a stop and the audience filed out of the Majestic Cinema for the last time on Saturday evening.

But Mrs. G. Wood, Carew Road, Mitcham, waited until the cinema was empty before she walked out. She had been the first person in Mitcham’s only
cinema house 27 years ago and she intended to be the last one out.

Mrs. Wood’s husband, George, had intended to be with her at the last performance but other commitments kept him away. Both had attended the first film on the opening night and enjoyed numerous films there for 25 years.

I’ve never played bingo and I don’t think I will,” added Mr.

1961 Baths Superintendent retires

From the Mitcham News & Mercury, 24th February, 1961

For the past 28 years Mr Charles Paterson Walker has been keeping 126,000 gallons of water clean and at the right temperature.

Next May he won’t have to bother any more. He is retiring from the post of Mitcham Baths Superintendent.

But 65-year-old Mr Walker will not be forgotten when he leaves. By the end of the month he hopes to finish his “diary of events,” telling the story of the Baths.

At his Epsom home he told me this week: “There have been so many events there over the years I thought I would keep a record.”

Mr Walker himself has led an interesting life. Before he took over the Baths in 1929 he was a marine engineer on a luxury shipping line. He left because of the big slump at the time.

During the last war his main task was keeping about 150,000 officers and men and 500 Wrens warm. He was in charge of the heating at a Fleet Air Arm training base in Lancashire.

Any plans for his retirement?
“I am just going to take things easy,” he said.

120 to 154 Morden Road

120 to 154 Morden Road, Mitcham CR4 4DB, is a terrace of shops with flats above. It is on the north side of Morden Road, at the right hand side of the entrance to Deer Park Gardens. To its right is Ravensbury Path, which crosses the tram line and connects to Church Path.

Photo taken December 2017.

The tower is on the west end of the block. It houses the stairwell leading to the first and second floors. Photo taken December 2017.

Locally listed June 1994, Merton council says:

This is a terrace of inter war shops with flats over, which is built of brick. It is a three storey building, in which the top floor is contained within a mansard roof. The main frontage contains little of particular interest except for the glazed green tiles on the steeper of the slopes of the mansard roof. The end of the terrace has an unusual round tower feature surmounted by a pyramidal roof with the same green tiles. The brickwork on this tower also contains small details of interest. The chimneys at each end of the building are also of some interest, as they follow a curved line at first floor level. It should also be noted that almost all of the original details relating to the shopfronts has now been lost, and that original windows have almost all been replaced. The end elevation which is of greatest interest is disfigured by a large advertising hoarding.

Some of the original wall design is now visible due to changes in signs above the shops.

Photo taken December 2017.

1952 OS map

Stanmore Motors was at number 120. It is listed in the 1954 and 1971 telephone directories as MITcham 2796, and 01-648 2796.

Maps are reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland.